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authorMikhail Terekhov <terekhov@emc.com>2017-01-17 21:01:50 -0500
committerMikhail Terekhov <terekhov@emc.com>2017-01-17 21:01:50 -0500
commit74ddd43820cb223513def1f7d856b32874d81d21 (patch)
tree2a4bf30395ee02c73ea720137ccad4821ad465fe /README
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-Overview and history
---------------------
-
-Fio was originally written to save me the hassle of writing special test case
-programs when I wanted to test a specific workload, either for performance
-reasons or to find/reproduce a bug. The process of writing such a test app can
-be tiresome, especially if you have to do it often. Hence I needed a tool that
-would be able to simulate a given I/O workload without resorting to writing a
-tailored test case again and again.
-
-A test work load is difficult to define, though. There can be any number of
-processes or threads involved, and they can each be using their own way of
-generating I/O. You could have someone dirtying large amounts of memory in an
-memory mapped file, or maybe several threads issuing reads using asynchronous
-I/O. fio needed to be flexible enough to simulate both of these cases, and many
-more.
-
-Fio spawns a number of threads or processes doing a particular type of I/O
-action as specified by the user. fio takes a number of global parameters, each
-inherited by the thread unless otherwise parameters given to them overriding
-that setting is given. The typical use of fio is to write a job file matching
-the I/O load one wants to simulate.
-
-
-Source
-------
-
-Fio resides in a git repo, the canonical place is:
-
- git://git.kernel.dk/fio.git
-
-When inside a corporate firewall, git:// URL sometimes does not work.
-If git:// does not work, use the http protocol instead:
-
- http://git.kernel.dk/fio.git
-
-Snapshots are frequently generated and :file:`fio-git-*.tar.gz` include the git
-meta data as well. Other tarballs are archives of official fio releases.
-Snapshots can download from:
-
- http://brick.kernel.dk/snaps/
-
-There are also two official mirrors. Both of these are automatically synced with
-the main repository, when changes are pushed. If the main repo is down for some
-reason, either one of these is safe to use as a backup:
-
- git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/axboe/fio.git
-
- https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/axboe/fio.git
-
-or
-
- git://github.com/axboe/fio.git
-
- https://github.com/axboe/fio.git
-
-
-Mailing list
-------------
-
-The fio project mailing list is meant for anything related to fio including
-general discussion, bug reporting, questions, and development.
-
-An automated mail detailing recent commits is automatically sent to the list at
-most daily. The list address is fio@vger.kernel.org, subscribe by sending an
-email to majordomo@vger.kernel.org with
-
- subscribe fio
-
-in the body of the email. Archives can be found here:
-
- http://www.spinics.net/lists/fio/
-
-and archives for the old list can be found here:
-
- http://maillist.kernel.dk/fio-devel/
-
-
-Author
-------
-
-Fio was written by Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> to enable flexible testing of
-the Linux I/O subsystem and schedulers. He got tired of writing specific test
-applications to simulate a given workload, and found that the existing I/O
-benchmark/test tools out there weren't flexible enough to do what he wanted.
-
-Jens Axboe <axboe@kernel.dk> 20060905
-
-
-Binary packages
----------------
-
-Debian:
- Starting with Debian "Squeeze", fio packages are part of the official
- Debian repository. http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=fio.
-
-Ubuntu:
- Starting with Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (aka "Lucid Lynx"), fio packages are part
- of the Ubuntu "universe" repository.
- http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=fio.
-
-Red Hat, CentOS & Co:
- Dag Wieƫrs has RPMs for Red Hat related distros, find them here:
- http://dag.wieers.com/rpm/packages/fio/.
-
-Mandriva:
- Mandriva has integrated fio into their package repository, so installing
- on that distro should be as easy as typing ``urpmi fio``.
-
-Solaris:
- Packages for Solaris are available from OpenCSW. Install their pkgutil
- tool (http://www.opencsw.org/get-it/pkgutil/) and then install fio via
- ``pkgutil -i fio``.
-
-Windows:
- Rebecca Cran <rebecca+fio@bluestop.org> has fio packages for Windows at
- http://www.bluestop.org/fio/ .
-
-BSDs:
- Packages for BSDs may be available from their binary package repositories.
- Look for a package "fio" using their binary package managers.
-
-
-Building
---------
-
-Just type::
-
- $ ./configure
- $ make
- $ make install
-
-Note that GNU make is required. On BSDs it's available from devel/gmake within
-ports directory; on Solaris it's in the SUNWgmake package. On platforms where
-GNU make isn't the default, type ``gmake`` instead of ``make``.
-
-Configure will print the enabled options. Note that on Linux based platforms,
-the libaio development packages must be installed to use the libaio
-engine. Depending on distro, it is usually called libaio-devel or libaio-dev.
-
-For gfio, gtk 2.18 (or newer), associated glib threads, and cairo are required
-to be installed. gfio isn't built automatically and can be enabled with a
-``--enable-gfio`` option to configure.
-
-To build fio with a cross-compiler::
-
- $ make clean
- $ make CROSS_COMPILE=/path/to/toolchain/prefix
-
-Configure will attempt to determine the target platform automatically.
-
-It's possible to build fio for ESX as well, use the ``--esx`` switch to
-configure.
-
-
-Windows
-~~~~~~~
-
-On Windows, Cygwin (http://www.cygwin.com/) is required in order to build
-fio. To create an MSI installer package install WiX 3.8 from
-http://wixtoolset.org and run :file:`dobuild.cmd` from the :file:`os/windows`
-directory.
-
-How to compile fio on 64-bit Windows:
-
- 1. Install Cygwin (http://www.cygwin.com/). Install **make** and all
- packages starting with **mingw64-i686** and **mingw64-x86_64**.
- 2. Open the Cygwin Terminal.
- 3. Go to the fio directory (source files).
- 4. Run ``make clean && make -j``.
-
-To build fio on 32-bit Windows, run ``./configure --build-32bit-win`` before
-``make``.
-
-It's recommended that once built or installed, fio be run in a Command Prompt or
-other 'native' console such as console2, since there are known to be display and
-signal issues when running it under a Cygwin shell (see
-http://code.google.com/p/mintty/issues/detail?id=56 for details).
-
-
-Documentation
-~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-
-Fio uses Sphinx_ to generate documentation from the reStructuredText_ files.
-To build HTML formatted documentation run ``make -C doc html`` and direct your
-browser to :file:`./doc/output/html/index.html`. To build manual page run
-``make -C doc man`` and then ``man doc/output/man/fio.1``. To see what other
-output formats are supported run ``make -C doc help``.
-
-.. _reStructuredText: http://www.sphinx-doc.org/rest.html
-.. _Sphinx: http://www.sphinx-doc.org
-
-
-Platforms
----------
-
-Fio works on (at least) Linux, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX, OSX, NetBSD, OpenBSD,
-Windows, FreeBSD, and DragonFly. Some features and/or options may only be
-available on some of the platforms, typically because those features only apply
-to that platform (like the solarisaio engine, or the splice engine on Linux).
-
-Some features are not available on FreeBSD/Solaris even if they could be
-implemented, I'd be happy to take patches for that. An example of that is disk
-utility statistics and (I think) huge page support, support for that does exist
-in FreeBSD/Solaris.
-
-Fio uses pthread mutexes for signalling and locking and FreeBSD does not
-support process shared pthread mutexes. As a result, only threads are
-supported on FreeBSD. This could be fixed with sysv ipc locking or
-other locking alternatives.
-
-Other \*BSD platforms are untested, but fio should work there almost out of the
-box. Since I don't do test runs or even compiles on those platforms, your
-mileage may vary. Sending me patches for other platforms is greatly
-appreciated. There's a lot of value in having the same test/benchmark tool
-available on all platforms.
-
-Note that POSIX aio is not enabled by default on AIX. Messages like these::
-
- Symbol resolution failed for /usr/lib/libc.a(posix_aio.o) because:
- Symbol _posix_kaio_rdwr (number 2) is not exported from dependent module /unix.
-
-indicate one needs to enable POSIX aio. Run the following commands as root::
-
- # lsdev -C -l posix_aio0
- posix_aio0 Defined Posix Asynchronous I/O
- # cfgmgr -l posix_aio0
- # lsdev -C -l posix_aio0
- posix_aio0 Available Posix Asynchronous I/O
-
-POSIX aio should work now. To make the change permanent::
-
- # chdev -l posix_aio0 -P -a autoconfig='available'
- posix_aio0 changed
-
-
-Running fio
------------
-
-Running fio is normally the easiest part - you just give it the job file
-(or job files) as parameters::
-
- $ fio [options] [jobfile] ...
-
-and it will start doing what the *jobfile* tells it to do. You can give more
-than one job file on the command line, fio will serialize the running of those
-files. Internally that is the same as using the :option:`stonewall` parameter
-described in the parameter section.
-
-If the job file contains only one job, you may as well just give the parameters
-on the command line. The command line parameters are identical to the job
-parameters, with a few extra that control global parameters. For example, for
-the job file parameter :option:`iodepth=2 <iodepth>`, the mirror command line
-option would be :option:`--iodepth 2 <iodepth>` or :option:`--iodepth=2
-<iodepth>`. You can also use the command line for giving more than one job
-entry. For each :option:`--name <name>` option that fio sees, it will start a
-new job with that name. Command line entries following a
-:option:`--name <name>` entry will apply to that job, until there are no more
-entries or a new :option:`--name <name>` entry is seen. This is similar to the
-job file options, where each option applies to the current job until a new []
-job entry is seen.
-
-fio does not need to run as root, except if the files or devices specified in
-the job section requires that. Some other options may also be restricted, such
-as memory locking, I/O scheduler switching, and decreasing the nice value.
-
-If *jobfile* is specified as ``-``, the job file will be read from standard
-input.