Merge branch 'doc-patches' of https://github.com/vincentkfu/fio
[fio.git] / fio.1
diff --git a/fio.1 b/fio.1
index ebb4899..b943db2 100644 (file)
--- a/fio.1
+++ b/fio.1
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.TH fio 1 "December 2014" "User Manual"
+.TH fio 1 "August 2017" "User Manual"
 .SH NAME
 fio \- flexible I/O tester
 .SH SYNOPSIS
@@ -13,217 +13,549 @@ one wants to simulate.
 .SH OPTIONS
 .TP
 .BI \-\-debug \fR=\fPtype
-Enable verbose tracing of various fio actions. May be `all' for all types
-or individual types separated by a comma (eg \-\-debug=io,file). `help' will
-list all available tracing options.
+Enable verbose tracing \fItype\fR of various fio actions. May be `all' for all \fItype\fRs
+or individual types separated by a comma (e.g. `\-\-debug=file,mem' will enable
+file and memory debugging). `help' will list all available tracing options.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-parse\-only
+Parse options only, don't start any I/O.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-output \fR=\fPfilename
 Write output to \fIfilename\fR.
 .TP
-.BI \-\-output-format \fR=\fPformat
-Set the reporting format to \fInormal\fR, \fIterse\fR, \fIjson\fR, or
-\fIjson+\fR. Multiple formats can be selected, separate by a comma. \fIterse\fR
-is a CSV based format. \fIjson+\fR is like \fIjson\fR, except it adds a full
+.BI \-\-output\-format \fR=\fPformat
+Set the reporting \fIformat\fR to `normal', `terse', `json', or
+`json+'. Multiple formats can be selected, separate by a comma. `terse'
+is a CSV based format. `json+' is like `json', except it adds a full
 dump of the latency buckets.
 .TP
-.BI \-\-runtime \fR=\fPruntime
-Limit run time to \fIruntime\fR seconds.
-.TP
-.B \-\-bandwidth\-log
-Generate per-job bandwidth logs.
+.BI \-\-bandwidth\-log
+Generate aggregate bandwidth logs.
 .TP
-.B \-\-minimal
-Print statistics in a terse, semicolon-delimited format.
+.BI \-\-minimal
+Print statistics in a terse, semicolon\-delimited format.
 .TP
-.B \-\-append-terse
-Print statistics in selected mode AND terse, semicolon-delimited format.
-Deprecated, use \-\-output-format instead to select multiple formats.
-.TP
-.B \-\-version
-Display version information and exit.
+.BI \-\-append\-terse
+Print statistics in selected mode AND terse, semicolon\-delimited format.
+\fBDeprecated\fR, use \fB\-\-output\-format\fR instead to select multiple formats.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-terse\-version \fR=\fPversion
-Set terse version output format (Current version 3, or older version 2).
+Set terse \fIversion\fR output format (default `3', or `2', `4', `5').
+.TP
+.BI \-\-version
+Print version information and exit.
 .TP
-.B \-\-help
-Display usage information and exit.
+.BI \-\-help
+Print a summary of the command line options and exit.
 .TP
-.B \-\-cpuclock-test
-Perform test and validation of internal CPU clock
+.BI \-\-cpuclock\-test
+Perform test and validation of internal CPU clock.
 .TP
-.BI \-\-crctest[\fR=\fPtest]
-Test the speed of the builtin checksumming functions. If no argument is given,
-all of them are tested. Or a comma separated list can be passed, in which
+.BI \-\-crctest \fR=\fP[test]
+Test the speed of the built\-in checksumming functions. If no argument is given,
+all of them are tested. Alternatively, a comma separated list can be passed, in which
 case the given ones are tested.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-cmdhelp \fR=\fPcommand
-Print help information for \fIcommand\fR.  May be `all' for all commands.
+Print help information for \fIcommand\fR. May be `all' for all commands.
 .TP
-.BI \-\-enghelp \fR=\fPioengine[,command]
-List all commands defined by \fIioengine\fR, or print help for \fIcommand\fR defined by \fIioengine\fR.
+.BI \-\-enghelp \fR=\fP[ioengine[,command]]
+List all commands defined by \fIioengine\fR, or print help for \fIcommand\fR
+defined by \fIioengine\fR. If no \fIioengine\fR is given, list all
+available ioengines.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-showcmd \fR=\fPjobfile
-Convert \fIjobfile\fR to a set of command-line options.
+Convert \fIjobfile\fR to a set of command\-line options.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-readonly
+Turn on safety read\-only checks, preventing writes. The \fB\-\-readonly\fR
+option is an extra safety guard to prevent users from accidentally starting
+a write workload when that is not desired. Fio will only write if
+`rw=write/randwrite/rw/randrw' is given. This extra safety net can be used
+as an extra precaution as \fB\-\-readonly\fR will also enable a write check in
+the I/O engine core to prevent writes due to unknown user space bug(s).
 .TP
 .BI \-\-eta \fR=\fPwhen
-Specifies when real-time ETA estimate should be printed.  \fIwhen\fR may
-be one of `always', `never' or `auto'.
+Specifies when real\-time ETA estimate should be printed. \fIwhen\fR may
+be `always', `never' or `auto'.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-eta\-newline \fR=\fPtime
-Force an ETA newline for every `time` period passed.
+Force a new line for every \fItime\fR period passed. When the unit is omitted,
+the value is interpreted in seconds.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-status\-interval \fR=\fPtime
-Report full output status every `time` period passed.
-.TP
-.BI \-\-readonly
-Turn on safety read-only checks, preventing any attempted write.
-.TP
-.BI \-\-section \fR=\fPsec
-Only run section \fIsec\fR from job file. This option can be used multiple times to add more sections to run.
+Force a full status dump of cumulative (from job start) values at \fItime\fR
+intervals. This option does *not* provide per-period measurements. So
+values such as bandwidth are running averages. When the time unit is omitted,
+\fItime\fR is interpreted in seconds.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-section \fR=\fPname
+Only run specified section \fIname\fR in job file. Multiple sections can be specified.
+The \fB\-\-section\fR option allows one to combine related jobs into one file.
+E.g. one job file could define light, moderate, and heavy sections. Tell
+fio to run only the "heavy" section by giving `\-\-section=heavy'
+command line option. One can also specify the "write" operations in one
+section and "verify" operation in another section. The \fB\-\-section\fR option
+only applies to job sections. The reserved *global* section is always
+parsed and used.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-alloc\-size \fR=\fPkb
-Set the internal smalloc pool size to \fIkb\fP kilobytes.
+Set the internal smalloc pool size to \fIkb\fR in KiB. The
+\fB\-\-alloc\-size\fR switch allows one to use a larger pool size for smalloc.
+If running large jobs with randommap enabled, fio can run out of memory.
+Smalloc is an internal allocator for shared structures from a fixed size
+memory pool and can grow to 16 pools. The pool size defaults to 16MiB.
+NOTE: While running `.fio_smalloc.*' backing store files are visible
+in `/tmp'.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-warnings\-fatal
 All fio parser warnings are fatal, causing fio to exit with an error.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-max\-jobs \fR=\fPnr
-Set the maximum allowed number of jobs (threads/processes) to support.
+Set the maximum number of threads/processes to support to \fInr\fR.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-server \fR=\fPargs
-Start a backend server, with \fIargs\fP specifying what to listen to. See client/server section.
+Start a backend server, with \fIargs\fR specifying what to listen to.
+See \fBCLIENT/SERVER\fR section.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-daemonize \fR=\fPpidfile
-Background a fio server, writing the pid to the given pid file.
+Background a fio server, writing the pid to the given \fIpidfile\fR file.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-client \fR=\fPhostname
+Instead of running the jobs locally, send and run them on the given \fIhostname\fR
+or set of \fIhostname\fRs. See \fBCLIENT/SERVER\fR section.
 .TP
-.BI \-\-client \fR=\fPhost
-Instead of running the jobs locally, send and run them on the given host or set of hosts.  See client/server section.
+.BI \-\-remote\-config \fR=\fPfile
+Tell fio server to load this local \fIfile\fR.
 .TP
 .BI \-\-idle\-prof \fR=\fPoption
-Report cpu idleness on a system or percpu basis (\fIoption\fP=system,percpu) or run unit work calibration only (\fIoption\fP=calibrate).
-.SH "JOB FILE FORMAT"
-Job files are in `ini' format. They consist of one or more
-job definitions, which begin with a job name in square brackets and
-extend to the next job name.  The job name can be any ASCII string
-except `global', which has a special meaning.  Following the job name is
-a sequence of zero or more parameters, one per line, that define the
-behavior of the job.  Any line starting with a `;' or `#' character is
-considered a comment and ignored.
-.P
-If \fIjobfile\fR is specified as `-', the job file will be read from
-standard input.
-.SS "Global Section"
-The global section contains default parameters for jobs specified in the
-job file.  A job is only affected by global sections residing above it,
-and there may be any number of global sections.  Specific job definitions
-may override any parameter set in global sections.
-.SH "JOB PARAMETERS"
-.SS Types
-Some parameters may take arguments of a specific type.
-Anywhere a numeric value is required, an arithmetic expression may be used,
-provided it is surrounded by parentheses. Supported operators are:
+Report CPU idleness. \fIoption\fR is one of the following:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
-.B addition (+)
+.B calibrate
+Run unit work calibration only and exit.
 .TP
-.B subtraction (-)
+.B system
+Show aggregate system idleness and unit work.
 .TP
-.B multiplication (*)
+.B percpu
+As \fBsystem\fR but also show per CPU idleness.
+.RE
+.RE
 .TP
-.B division (/)
+.BI \-\-inflate\-log \fR=\fPlog
+Inflate and output compressed \fIlog\fR.
 .TP
-.B modulus (%)
+.BI \-\-trigger\-file \fR=\fPfile
+Execute trigger command when \fIfile\fR exists.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-trigger\-timeout \fR=\fPtime
+Execute trigger at this \fItime\fR.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-trigger \fR=\fPcommand
+Set this \fIcommand\fR as local trigger.
 .TP
+.BI \-\-trigger\-remote \fR=\fPcommand
+Set this \fIcommand\fR as remote trigger.
+.TP
+.BI \-\-aux\-path \fR=\fPpath
+Use this \fIpath\fR for fio state generated files.
+.SH "JOB FILE FORMAT"
+Any parameters following the options will be assumed to be job files, unless
+they match a job file parameter. Multiple job files can be listed and each job
+file will be regarded as a separate group. Fio will \fBstonewall\fR execution
+between each group.
+
+Fio accepts one or more job files describing what it is
+supposed to do. The job file format is the classic ini file, where the names
+enclosed in [] brackets define the job name. You are free to use any ASCII name
+you want, except *global* which has special meaning. Following the job name is
+a sequence of zero or more parameters, one per line, that define the behavior of
+the job. If the first character in a line is a ';' or a '#', the entire line is
+discarded as a comment.
+
+A *global* section sets defaults for the jobs described in that file. A job may
+override a *global* section parameter, and a job file may even have several
+*global* sections if so desired. A job is only affected by a *global* section
+residing above it.
+
+The \fB\-\-cmdhelp\fR option also lists all options. If used with an \fIcommand\fR
+argument, \fB\-\-cmdhelp\fR will detail the given \fIcommand\fR.
+
+See the `examples/' directory for inspiration on how to write job files. Note
+the copyright and license requirements currently apply to
+`examples/' files.
+.SH "JOB FILE PARAMETERS"
+Some parameters take an option of a given type, such as an integer or a
+string. Anywhere a numeric value is required, an arithmetic expression may be
+used, provided it is surrounded by parentheses. Supported operators are:
+.RS
+.P
+.B addition (+)
+.P
+.B subtraction (\-)
+.P
+.B multiplication (*)
+.P
+.B division (/)
+.P
+.B modulus (%)
+.P
 .B exponentiation (^)
 .RE
-.RE
 .P
 For time values in expressions, units are microseconds by default. This is
 different than for time values not in expressions (not enclosed in
-parentheses). The types used are:
+parentheses).
+.SH "PARAMETER TYPES"
+The following parameter types are used.
 .TP
 .I str
-String: a sequence of alphanumeric characters.
+String. A sequence of alphanumeric characters.
+.TP
+.I time
+Integer with possible time suffix. Without a unit value is interpreted as
+seconds unless otherwise specified. Accepts a suffix of 'd' for days, 'h' for
+hours, 'm' for minutes, 's' for seconds, 'ms' (or 'msec') for milliseconds and 'us'
+(or 'usec') for microseconds. For example, use 10m for 10 minutes.
 .TP
 .I int
-SI integer: a whole number, possibly containing a suffix denoting the base unit
-of the value.  Accepted suffixes are `k', 'M', 'G', 'T', and 'P', denoting
-kilo (1024), mega (1024^2), giga (1024^3), tera (1024^4), and peta (1024^5)
-respectively. If prefixed with '0x', the value is assumed to be base 16
-(hexadecimal). A suffix may include a trailing 'b', for instance 'kb' is
-identical to 'k'. You can specify a base 10 value by using 'KiB', 'MiB','GiB',
-etc. This is useful for disk drives where values are often given in base 10
-values. Specifying '30GiB' will get you 30*1000^3 bytes.
-When specifying times the default suffix meaning changes, still denoting the
-base unit of the value, but accepted suffixes are 'D' (days), 'H' (hours), 'M'
-(minutes), 'S' Seconds, 'ms' (or msec) milli seconds, 'us' (or 'usec') micro
-seconds. Time values without a unit specify seconds.
-The suffixes are not case sensitive.
+Integer. A whole number value, which may contain an integer prefix
+and an integer suffix.
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+[*integer prefix*] **number** [*integer suffix*]
+.RE
+.P
+The optional *integer prefix* specifies the number's base. The default
+is decimal. *0x* specifies hexadecimal.
+.P
+The optional *integer suffix* specifies the number's units, and includes an
+optional unit prefix and an optional unit. For quantities of data, the
+default unit is bytes. For quantities of time, the default unit is seconds
+unless otherwise specified.
+.P
+With `kb_base=1000', fio follows international standards for unit
+prefixes. To specify power\-of\-10 decimal values defined in the
+International System of Units (SI):
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+K means kilo (K) or 1000
+.P
+M means mega (M) or 1000**2
+.P
+G means giga (G) or 1000**3
+.P
+T means tera (T) or 1000**4
+.P
+P means peta (P) or 1000**5
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
+To specify power\-of\-2 binary values defined in IEC 80000\-13:
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+Ki means kibi (Ki) or 1024
+.P
+Mi means mebi (Mi) or 1024**2
+.P
+Gi means gibi (Gi) or 1024**3
+.P
+Ti means tebi (Ti) or 1024**4
+.P
+Pi means pebi (Pi) or 1024**5
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
+With `kb_base=1024' (the default), the unit prefixes are opposite
+from those specified in the SI and IEC 80000\-13 standards to provide
+compatibility with old scripts. For example, 4k means 4096.
+.P
+For quantities of data, an optional unit of 'B' may be included
+(e.g., 'kB' is the same as 'k').
+.P
+The *integer suffix* is not case sensitive (e.g., m/mi mean mebi/mega,
+not milli). 'b' and 'B' both mean byte, not bit.
+.P
+Examples with `kb_base=1000':
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+4 KiB: 4096, 4096b, 4096B, 4k, 4kb, 4kB, 4K, 4KB
+.P
+1 MiB: 1048576, 1m, 1024k
+.P
+1 MB: 1000000, 1mi, 1000ki
+.P
+1 TiB: 1073741824, 1t, 1024m, 1048576k
+.P
+1 TB: 1000000000, 1ti, 1000mi, 1000000ki
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
+Examples with `kb_base=1024' (default):
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+4 KiB: 4096, 4096b, 4096B, 4k, 4kb, 4kB, 4K, 4KB
+.P
+1 MiB: 1048576, 1m, 1024k
+.P
+1 MB: 1000000, 1mi, 1000ki
+.P
+1 TiB: 1073741824, 1t, 1024m, 1048576k
+.P
+1 TB: 1000000000, 1ti, 1000mi, 1000000ki
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
+To specify times (units are not case sensitive):
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+D means days
+.P
+H means hours
+.P
+M mean minutes
+.P
+s or sec means seconds (default)
+.P
+ms or msec means milliseconds
+.P
+us or usec means microseconds
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
+If the option accepts an upper and lower range, use a colon ':' or
+minus '\-' to separate such values. See \fIirange\fR parameter type.
+If the lower value specified happens to be larger than the upper value
+the two values are swapped.
+.RE
 .TP
 .I bool
-Boolean: a true or false value. `0' denotes false, `1' denotes true.
+Boolean. Usually parsed as an integer, however only defined for
+true and false (1 and 0).
 .TP
 .I irange
-Integer range: a range of integers specified in the format
-\fIlower\fR:\fIupper\fR or \fIlower\fR\-\fIupper\fR. \fIlower\fR and
-\fIupper\fR may contain a suffix as described above.  If an option allows two
-sets of ranges, they are separated with a `,' or `/' character. For example:
-`8\-8k/8M\-4G'.
+Integer range with suffix. Allows value range to be given, such as
+1024\-4096. A colon may also be used as the separator, e.g. 1k:4k. If the
+option allows two sets of ranges, they can be specified with a ',' or '/'
+delimiter: 1k\-4k/8k\-32k. Also see \fIint\fR parameter type.
 .TP
 .I float_list
-List of floating numbers: A list of floating numbers, separated by
-a ':' character.
-.SS "Parameter List"
+A list of floating point numbers, separated by a ':' character.
+.SH "JOB PARAMETERS"
+With the above in mind, here follows the complete list of fio job parameters.
+.SS "Units"
 .TP
-.BI name \fR=\fPstr
-May be used to override the job name.  On the command line, this parameter
-has the special purpose of signalling the start of a new job.
+.BI kb_base \fR=\fPint
+Select the interpretation of unit prefixes in input parameters.
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.BI wait_for \fR=\fPstr
-Specifies the name of the already defined job to wait for. Single waitee name
-only may be specified. If set, the job won't be started until all workers of
-the waitee job are done.  Wait_for operates on the job name basis, so there are
-a few limitations. First, the waitee must be defined prior to the waiter job
-(meaning no forward references). Second, if a job is being referenced as a
-waitee, it must have a unique name (no duplicate waitees).
+.B 1000
+Inputs comply with IEC 80000\-13 and the International
+System of Units (SI). Use:
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+\- power\-of\-2 values with IEC prefixes (e.g., KiB)
+.P
+\- power\-of\-10 values with SI prefixes (e.g., kB)
+.PD
+.RE
+.TP
+.B 1024
+Compatibility mode (default). To avoid breaking old scripts:
+.P
+.RS
+.PD 0
+\- power\-of\-2 values with SI prefixes
+.P
+\- power\-of\-10 values with IEC prefixes
+.PD
+.RE
+.RE
+.P
+See \fBbs\fR for more details on input parameters.
+.P
+Outputs always use correct prefixes. Most outputs include both
+side\-by\-side, like:
+.P
+.RS
+bw=2383.3kB/s (2327.4KiB/s)
+.RE
+.P
+If only one value is reported, then kb_base selects the one to use:
+.P
+.RS
+.PD 0
+1000 \-\- SI prefixes
+.P
+1024 \-\- IEC prefixes
+.PD
+.RE
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI unit_base \fR=\fPint
+Base unit for reporting. Allowed values are:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B 0
+Use auto\-detection (default).
+.TP
+.B 8
+Byte based.
+.TP
+.B 1
+Bit based.
+.RE
+.RE
+.SS "Job description"
+.TP
+.BI name \fR=\fPstr
+ASCII name of the job. This may be used to override the name printed by fio
+for this job. Otherwise the job name is used. On the command line this
+parameter has the special purpose of also signaling the start of a new job.
 .TP
 .BI description \fR=\fPstr
-Human-readable description of the job. It is printed when the job is run, but
-otherwise has no special purpose.
+Text description of the job. Doesn't do anything except dump this text
+description when this job is run. It's not parsed.
+.TP
+.BI loops \fR=\fPint
+Run the specified number of iterations of this job. Used to repeat the same
+workload a given number of times. Defaults to 1.
+.TP
+.BI numjobs \fR=\fPint
+Create the specified number of clones of this job. Each clone of job
+is spawned as an independent thread or process. May be used to setup a
+larger number of threads/processes doing the same thing. Each thread is
+reported separately; to see statistics for all clones as a whole, use
+\fBgroup_reporting\fR in conjunction with \fBnew_group\fR.
+See \fB\-\-max\-jobs\fR. Default: 1.
+.SS "Time related parameters"
+.TP
+.BI runtime \fR=\fPtime
+Tell fio to terminate processing after the specified period of time. It
+can be quite hard to determine for how long a specified job will run, so
+this parameter is handy to cap the total runtime to a given time. When
+the unit is omitted, the value is intepreted in seconds.
+.TP
+.BI time_based
+If set, fio will run for the duration of the \fBruntime\fR specified
+even if the file(s) are completely read or written. It will simply loop over
+the same workload as many times as the \fBruntime\fR allows.
+.TP
+.BI startdelay \fR=\fPirange(int)
+Delay the start of job for the specified amount of time. Can be a single
+value or a range. When given as a range, each thread will choose a value
+randomly from within the range. Value is in seconds if a unit is omitted.
+.TP
+.BI ramp_time \fR=\fPtime
+If set, fio will run the specified workload for this amount of time before
+logging any performance numbers. Useful for letting performance settle
+before logging results, thus minimizing the runtime required for stable
+results. Note that the \fBramp_time\fR is considered lead in time for a job,
+thus it will increase the total runtime if a special timeout or
+\fBruntime\fR is specified. When the unit is omitted, the value is
+given in seconds.
+.TP
+.BI clocksource \fR=\fPstr
+Use the given clocksource as the base of timing. The supported options are:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B gettimeofday
+\fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2)
+.TP
+.B clock_gettime
+\fBclock_gettime\fR\|(2)
+.TP
+.B cpu
+Internal CPU clock source
+.RE
+.P
+\fBcpu\fR is the preferred clocksource if it is reliable, as it is very fast (and
+fio is heavy on time calls). Fio will automatically use this clocksource if
+it's supported and considered reliable on the system it is running on,
+unless another clocksource is specifically set. For x86/x86\-64 CPUs, this
+means supporting TSC Invariant.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI gtod_reduce \fR=\fPbool
+Enable all of the \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) reducing options
+(\fBdisable_clat\fR, \fBdisable_slat\fR, \fBdisable_bw_measurement\fR) plus
+reduce precision of the timeout somewhat to really shrink the
+\fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) call count. With this option enabled, we only do
+about 0.4% of the \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) calls we would have done if all
+time keeping was enabled.
+.TP
+.BI gtod_cpu \fR=\fPint
+Sometimes it's cheaper to dedicate a single thread of execution to just
+getting the current time. Fio (and databases, for instance) are very
+intensive on \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) calls. With this option, you can set
+one CPU aside for doing nothing but logging current time to a shared memory
+location. Then the other threads/processes that run I/O workloads need only
+copy that segment, instead of entering the kernel with a
+\fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) call. The CPU set aside for doing these time
+calls will be excluded from other uses. Fio will manually clear it from the
+CPU mask of other jobs.
+.SS "Target file/device"
 .TP
 .BI directory \fR=\fPstr
-Prefix filenames with this directory.  Used to place files in a location other
-than `./'.
-You can specify a number of directories by separating the names with a ':'
-character. These directories will be assigned equally distributed to job clones
-creates with \fInumjobs\fR as long as they are using generated filenames.
-If specific \fIfilename(s)\fR are set fio will use the first listed directory,
-and thereby matching the  \fIfilename\fR semantic which generates a file each
-clone if not specified, but let all clones use the same if set. See
-\fIfilename\fR for considerations regarding escaping certain characters on
-some platforms.
+Prefix \fBfilename\fRs with this directory. Used to place files in a different
+location than `./'. You can specify a number of directories by
+separating the names with a ':' character. These directories will be
+assigned equally distributed to job clones created by \fBnumjobs\fR as
+long as they are using generated filenames. If specific \fBfilename\fR(s) are
+set fio will use the first listed directory, and thereby matching the
+\fBfilename\fR semantic which generates a file each clone if not specified, but
+let all clones use the same if set.
+.RS
+.P
+See the \fBfilename\fR option for information on how to escape ':' and '\'
+characters within the directory path itself.
+.RE
 .TP
 .BI filename \fR=\fPstr
-.B fio
-normally makes up a file name based on the job name, thread number, and file
-number. If you want to share files between threads in a job or several jobs,
-specify a \fIfilename\fR for each of them to override the default.
-If the I/O engine is file-based, you can specify
-a number of files by separating the names with a `:' character. `\-' is a
-reserved name, meaning stdin or stdout, depending on the read/write direction
-set. On Windows, disk devices are accessed as \\.\PhysicalDrive0 for the first
-device, \\.\PhysicalDrive1 for the second etc. Note: Windows and FreeBSD
-prevent write access to areas of the disk containing in-use data
-(e.g. filesystems). If the wanted filename does need to include a colon, then
-escape that with a '\\' character. For instance, if the filename is
-"/dev/dsk/foo@3,0:c", then you would use filename="/dev/dsk/foo@3,0\\:c".
+Fio normally makes up a \fBfilename\fR based on the job name, thread number, and
+file number (see \fBfilename_format\fR). If you want to share files
+between threads in a job or several
+jobs with fixed file paths, specify a \fBfilename\fR for each of them to override
+the default. If the ioengine is file based, you can specify a number of files
+by separating the names with a ':' colon. So if you wanted a job to open
+`/dev/sda' and `/dev/sdb' as the two working files, you would use
+`filename=/dev/sda:/dev/sdb'. This also means that whenever this option is
+specified, \fBnrfiles\fR is ignored. The size of regular files specified
+by this option will be \fBsize\fR divided by number of files unless an
+explicit size is specified by \fBfilesize\fR.
+.RS
+.P
+Each colon and backslash in the wanted path must be escaped with a '\'
+character. For instance, if the path is `/dev/dsk/foo@3,0:c' then you
+would use `filename=/dev/dsk/foo@3,0\\:c' and if the path is
+`F:\\\\filename' then you would use `filename=F\\:\\\\filename'.
+.P
+On Windows, disk devices are accessed as `\\\\\\\\.\\\\PhysicalDrive0' for
+the first device, `\\\\\\\\.\\\\PhysicalDrive1' for the second etc.
+Note: Windows and FreeBSD prevent write access to areas
+of the disk containing in\-use data (e.g. filesystems).
+.P
+The filename `\-' is a reserved name, meaning *stdin* or *stdout*. Which
+of the two depends on the read/write direction set.
+.RE
 .TP
 .BI filename_format \fR=\fPstr
-If sharing multiple files between jobs, it is usually necessary to have
-fio generate the exact names that you want. By default, fio will name a file
+If sharing multiple files between jobs, it is usually necessary to have fio
+generate the exact names that you want. By default, fio will name a file
 based on the default file format specification of
-\fBjobname.jobnumber.filenumber\fP. With this option, that can be
+`jobname.jobnumber.filenumber'. With this option, that can be
 customized. Fio will recognize and replace the following keywords in this
 string:
 .RS
@@ -239,39 +571,168 @@ The incremental number of the worker thread or process.
 The incremental number of the file for that worker thread or process.
 .RE
 .P
-To have dependent jobs share a set of files, this option can be set to
-have fio generate filenames that are shared between the two. For instance,
-if \fBtestfiles.$filenum\fR is specified, file number 4 for any job will
-be named \fBtestfiles.4\fR. The default of \fB$jobname.$jobnum.$filenum\fR
+To have dependent jobs share a set of files, this option can be set to have
+fio generate filenames that are shared between the two. For instance, if
+`testfiles.$filenum' is specified, file number 4 for any job will be
+named `testfiles.4'. The default of `$jobname.$jobnum.$filenum'
 will be used if no other format specifier is given.
 .RE
-.P
+.TP
+.BI unique_filename \fR=\fPbool
+To avoid collisions between networked clients, fio defaults to prefixing any
+generated filenames (with a directory specified) with the source of the
+client connecting. To disable this behavior, set this option to 0.
+.TP
+.BI opendir \fR=\fPstr
+Recursively open any files below directory \fIstr\fR.
 .TP
 .BI lockfile \fR=\fPstr
-Fio defaults to not locking any files before it does IO to them. If a file or
-file descriptor is shared, fio can serialize IO to that file to make the end
-result consistent. This is usual for emulating real workloads that share files.
-The lock modes are:
+Fio defaults to not locking any files before it does I/O to them. If a file
+or file descriptor is shared, fio can serialize I/O to that file to make the
+end result consistent. This is usual for emulating real workloads that share
+files. The lock modes are:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
 .B none
-No locking. This is the default.
+No locking. The default.
 .TP
 .B exclusive
-Only one thread or process may do IO at a time, excluding all others.
+Only one thread or process may do I/O at a time, excluding all others.
 .TP
 .B readwrite
-Read-write locking on the file. Many readers may access the file at the same
-time, but writes get exclusive access.
+Read\-write locking on the file. Many readers may
+access the file at the same time, but writes get exclusive access.
+.RE
 .RE
+.TP
+.BI nrfiles \fR=\fPint
+Number of files to use for this job. Defaults to 1. The size of files
+will be \fBsize\fR divided by this unless explicit size is specified by
+\fBfilesize\fR. Files are created for each thread separately, and each
+file will have a file number within its name by default, as explained in
+\fBfilename\fR section.
+.TP
+.BI openfiles \fR=\fPint
+Number of files to keep open at the same time. Defaults to the same as
+\fBnrfiles\fR, can be set smaller to limit the number simultaneous
+opens.
+.TP
+.BI file_service_type \fR=\fPstr
+Defines how fio decides which file from a job to service next. The following
+types are defined:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B random
+Choose a file at random.
+.TP
+.B roundrobin
+Round robin over opened files. This is the default.
+.TP
+.B sequential
+Finish one file before moving on to the next. Multiple files can
+still be open depending on \fBopenfiles\fR.
+.TP
+.B zipf
+Use a Zipf distribution to decide what file to access.
+.TP
+.B pareto
+Use a Pareto distribution to decide what file to access.
+.TP
+.B normal
+Use a Gaussian (normal) distribution to decide what file to access.
+.TP
+.B gauss
+Alias for normal.
 .RE
 .P
-.BI opendir \fR=\fPstr
-Recursively open any files below directory \fIstr\fR.
+For \fBrandom\fR, \fBroundrobin\fR, and \fBsequential\fR, a postfix can be appended to
+tell fio how many I/Os to issue before switching to a new file. For example,
+specifying `file_service_type=random:8' would cause fio to issue
+8 I/Os before selecting a new file at random. For the non\-uniform
+distributions, a floating point postfix can be given to influence how the
+distribution is skewed. See \fBrandom_distribution\fR for a description
+of how that would work.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI ioscheduler \fR=\fPstr
+Attempt to switch the device hosting the file to the specified I/O scheduler
+before running.
+.TP
+.BI create_serialize \fR=\fPbool
+If true, serialize the file creation for the jobs. This may be handy to
+avoid interleaving of data files, which may greatly depend on the filesystem
+used and even the number of processors in the system. Default: true.
+.TP
+.BI create_fsync \fR=\fPbool
+\fBfsync\fR\|(2) the data file after creation. This is the default.
+.TP
+.BI create_on_open \fR=\fPbool
+If true, don't pre\-create files but allow the job's open() to create a file
+when it's time to do I/O. Default: false \-\- pre\-create all necessary files
+when the job starts.
+.TP
+.BI create_only \fR=\fPbool
+If true, fio will only run the setup phase of the job. If files need to be
+laid out or updated on disk, only that will be done \-\- the actual job contents
+are not executed. Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI allow_file_create \fR=\fPbool
+If true, fio is permitted to create files as part of its workload. If this
+option is false, then fio will error out if
+the files it needs to use don't already exist. Default: true.
+.TP
+.BI allow_mounted_write \fR=\fPbool
+If this isn't set, fio will abort jobs that are destructive (e.g. that write)
+to what appears to be a mounted device or partition. This should help catch
+creating inadvertently destructive tests, not realizing that the test will
+destroy data on the mounted file system. Note that some platforms don't allow
+writing against a mounted device regardless of this option. Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI pre_read \fR=\fPbool
+If this is given, files will be pre\-read into memory before starting the
+given I/O operation. This will also clear the \fBinvalidate\fR flag,
+since it is pointless to pre\-read and then drop the cache. This will only
+work for I/O engines that are seek\-able, since they allow you to read the
+same data multiple times. Thus it will not work on non\-seekable I/O engines
+(e.g. network, splice). Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI unlink \fR=\fPbool
+Unlink the job files when done. Not the default, as repeated runs of that
+job would then waste time recreating the file set again and again. Default:
+false.
+.TP
+.BI unlink_each_loop \fR=\fPbool
+Unlink job files after each iteration or loop. Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI zonesize \fR=\fPint
+Divide a file into zones of the specified size. See \fBzoneskip\fR.
+.TP
+.BI zonerange \fR=\fPint
+Give size of an I/O zone. See \fBzoneskip\fR.
+.TP
+.BI zoneskip \fR=\fPint
+Skip the specified number of bytes when \fBzonesize\fR data has been
+read. The two zone options can be used to only do I/O on zones of a file.
+.SS "I/O type"
+.TP
+.BI direct \fR=\fPbool
+If value is true, use non\-buffered I/O. This is usually O_DIRECT. Note that
+OpenBSD and ZFS on Solaris don't support direct I/O. On Windows the synchronous
+ioengines don't support direct I/O. Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI atomic \fR=\fPbool
+If value is true, attempt to use atomic direct I/O. Atomic writes are
+guaranteed to be stable once acknowledged by the operating system. Only
+Linux supports O_ATOMIC right now.
+.TP
+.BI buffered \fR=\fPbool
+If value is true, use buffered I/O. This is the opposite of the
+\fBdirect\fR option. Defaults to true.
 .TP
 .BI readwrite \fR=\fPstr "\fR,\fP rw" \fR=\fPstr
-Type of I/O pattern.  Accepted values are:
+Type of I/O pattern. Accepted values are:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
@@ -282,7 +743,7 @@ Sequential reads.
 Sequential writes.
 .TP
 .B trim
-Sequential trim (Linux block devices only).
+Sequential trims (Linux block devices only).
 .TP
 .B randread
 Random reads.
@@ -291,72 +752,69 @@ Random reads.
 Random writes.
 .TP
 .B randtrim
-Random trim (Linux block devices only).
+Random trims (Linux block devices only).
 .TP
-.B rw, readwrite
-Mixed sequential reads and writes.
+.B rw,readwrite
+Sequential mixed reads and writes.
 .TP
 .B randrw
-Mixed random reads and writes.
+Random mixed reads and writes.
 .TP
 .B trimwrite
-Trim and write mixed workload. Blocks will be trimmed first, then the same
-blocks will be written to.
+Sequential trim+write sequences. Blocks will be trimmed first,
+then the same blocks will be written to.
 .RE
 .P
-For mixed I/O, the default split is 50/50. For certain types of io the result
-may still be skewed a bit, since the speed may be different. It is possible to
-specify a number of IO's to do before getting a new offset, this is done by
-appending a `:\fI<nr>\fR to the end of the string given. For a random read, it
-would look like \fBrw=randread:8\fR for passing in an offset modifier with a
-value of 8. If the postfix is used with a sequential IO pattern, then the value
-specified will be added to the generated offset for each IO. For instance,
-using \fBrw=write:4k\fR will skip 4k for every write. It turns sequential IO
-into sequential IO with holes. See the \fBrw_sequencer\fR option.
+Fio defaults to read if the option is not specified. For the mixed I/O
+types, the default is to split them 50/50. For certain types of I/O the
+result may still be skewed a bit, since the speed may be different.
+.P
+It is possible to specify the number of I/Os to do before getting a new
+offset by appending `:<nr>' to the end of the string given. For a
+random read, it would look like `rw=randread:8' for passing in an offset
+modifier with a value of 8. If the suffix is used with a sequential I/O
+pattern, then the `<nr>' value specified will be added to the generated
+offset for each I/O turning sequential I/O into sequential I/O with holes.
+For instance, using `rw=write:4k' will skip 4k for every write. Also see
+the \fBrw_sequencer\fR option.
 .RE
 .TP
 .BI rw_sequencer \fR=\fPstr
-If an offset modifier is given by appending a number to the \fBrw=<str>\fR line,
-then this option controls how that number modifies the IO offset being
-generated. Accepted values are:
+If an offset modifier is given by appending a number to the `rw=\fIstr\fR'
+line, then this option controls how that number modifies the I/O offset
+being generated. Accepted values are:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
 .B sequential
-Generate sequential offset
+Generate sequential offset.
 .TP
 .B identical
-Generate the same offset
+Generate the same offset.
 .RE
 .P
-\fBsequential\fR is only useful for random IO, where fio would normally
-generate a new random offset for every IO. If you append eg 8 to randread, you
-would get a new random offset for every 8 IO's. The result would be a seek for
-only every 8 IO's, instead of for every IO. Use \fBrw=randread:8\fR to specify
-that. As sequential IO is already sequential, setting \fBsequential\fR for that
-would not result in any differences.  \fBidentical\fR behaves in a similar
-fashion, except it sends the same offset 8 number of times before generating a
-new offset.
+\fBsequential\fR is only useful for random I/O, where fio would normally
+generate a new random offset for every I/O. If you append e.g. 8 to randread,
+you would get a new random offset for every 8 I/Os. The result would be a
+seek for only every 8 I/Os, instead of for every I/O. Use `rw=randread:8'
+to specify that. As sequential I/O is already sequential, setting
+\fBsequential\fR for that would not result in any differences. \fBidentical\fR
+behaves in a similar fashion, except it sends the same offset 8 number of
+times before generating a new offset.
 .RE
-.P
-.TP
-.BI kb_base \fR=\fPint
-The base unit for a kilobyte. The defacto base is 2^10, 1024.  Storage
-manufacturers like to use 10^3 or 1000 as a base ten unit instead, for obvious
-reasons. Allowed values are 1024 or 1000, with 1024 being the default.
 .TP
 .BI unified_rw_reporting \fR=\fPbool
 Fio normally reports statistics on a per data direction basis, meaning that
-read, write, and trim are accounted and reported separately. If this option is
-set fio sums the results and reports them as "mixed" instead.
+reads, writes, and trims are accounted and reported separately. If this
+option is set fio sums the results and report them as "mixed" instead.
 .TP
 .BI randrepeat \fR=\fPbool
-Seed the random number generator used for random I/O patterns in a predictable
-way so the pattern is repeatable across runs.  Default: true.
+Seed the random number generator used for random I/O patterns in a
+predictable way so the pattern is repeatable across runs. Default: true.
 .TP
 .BI allrandrepeat \fR=\fPbool
 Seed all random number generators in a predictable way so results are
-repeatable across runs.  Default: false.
+repeatable across runs. Default: false.
 .TP
 .BI randseed \fR=\fPint
 Seed the random number generators based on this seed value, to be able to
@@ -364,229 +822,612 @@ control what sequence of output is being generated. If not set, the random
 sequence depends on the \fBrandrepeat\fR setting.
 .TP
 .BI fallocate \fR=\fPstr
-Whether pre-allocation is performed when laying down files. Accepted values
-are:
+Whether pre\-allocation is performed when laying down files.
+Accepted values are:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
 .B none
-Do not pre-allocate space.
+Do not pre\-allocate space.
+.TP
+.B native
+Use a platform's native pre\-allocation call but fall back to
+\fBnone\fR behavior if it fails/is not implemented.
 .TP
 .B posix
-Pre-allocate via \fBposix_fallocate\fR\|(3).
+Pre\-allocate via \fBposix_fallocate\fR\|(3).
 .TP
 .B keep
-Pre-allocate via \fBfallocate\fR\|(2) with FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE set.
+Pre\-allocate via \fBfallocate\fR\|(2) with
+FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE set.
 .TP
 .B 0
-Backward-compatible alias for 'none'.
+Backward\-compatible alias for \fBnone\fR.
 .TP
 .B 1
-Backward-compatible alias for 'posix'.
+Backward\-compatible alias for \fBposix\fR.
 .RE
 .P
-May not be available on all supported platforms. 'keep' is only
-available on Linux. If using ZFS on Solaris this must be set to 'none'
-because ZFS doesn't support it. Default: 'posix'.
+May not be available on all supported platforms. \fBkeep\fR is only available
+on Linux. If using ZFS on Solaris this cannot be set to \fBposix\fR
+because ZFS doesn't support pre\-allocation. Default: \fBnative\fR if any
+pre\-allocation methods are available, \fBnone\fR if not.
 .RE
 .TP
-.BI fadvise_hint \fR=\fPbool
+.BI fadvise_hint \fR=\fPstr
 Use \fBposix_fadvise\fR\|(2) to advise the kernel what I/O patterns
-are likely to be issued. Default: true.
-.TP
-.BI fadvise_stream \fR=\fPint
-Use \fBposix_fadvise\fR\|(2) to advise the kernel what stream ID the
-writes issued belong to. Only supported on Linux. Note, this option
-may change going forward.
+are likely to be issued. Accepted values are:
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.BI size \fR=\fPint
-Total size of I/O for this job.  \fBfio\fR will run until this many bytes have
-been transferred, unless limited by other options (\fBruntime\fR, for instance,
-or increased/descreased by \fBio_size\fR). Unless \fBnrfiles\fR and
-\fBfilesize\fR options are given, this amount will be divided between the
-available files for the job. If not set, fio will use the full size of the
-given files or devices. If the files do not exist, size must be given. It is
-also possible to give size as a percentage between 1 and 100. If size=20% is
-given, fio will use 20% of the full size of the given files or devices.
+.B 0
+Backwards compatible hint for "no hint".
 .TP
-.BI io_size \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fB io_limit \fR=\fPint
-Normally fio operates within the region set by \fBsize\fR, which means that
-the \fBsize\fR option sets both the region and size of IO to be performed.
-Sometimes that is not what you want. With this option, it is possible to
-define just the amount of IO that fio should do. For instance, if \fBsize\fR
-is set to 20G and \fBio_limit\fR is set to 5G, fio will perform IO within
-the first 20G but exit when 5G have been done. The opposite is also
-possible - if \fBsize\fR is set to 20G, and \fBio_size\fR is set to 40G, then
-fio will do 40G of IO within the 0..20G region.
+.B 1
+Backwards compatible hint for "advise with fio workload type". This
+uses FADV_RANDOM for a random workload, and FADV_SEQUENTIAL
+for a sequential workload.
 .TP
-.BI fill_device \fR=\fPbool "\fR,\fB fill_fs" \fR=\fPbool
-Sets size to something really large and waits for ENOSPC (no space left on
-device) as the terminating condition. Only makes sense with sequential write.
-For a read workload, the mount point will be filled first then IO started on
-the result. This option doesn't make sense if operating on a raw device node,
-since the size of that is already known by the file system. Additionally,
-writing beyond end-of-device will not return ENOSPC there.
-.TP
-.BI filesize \fR=\fPirange
-Individual file sizes. May be a range, in which case \fBfio\fR will select sizes
-for files at random within the given range, limited to \fBsize\fR in total (if
-that is given). If \fBfilesize\fR is not specified, each created file is the
-same size.
+.B sequential
+Advise using FADV_SEQUENTIAL.
 .TP
-.BI file_append \fR=\fPbool
-Perform IO after the end of the file. Normally fio will operate within the
-size of a file. If this option is set, then fio will append to the file
-instead. This has identical behavior to setting \fRoffset\fP to the size
-of a file. This option is ignored on non-regular files.
-.TP
-.BI blocksize \fR=\fPint[,int] "\fR,\fB bs" \fR=\fPint[,int]
-Block size for I/O units.  Default: 4k.  Values for reads, writes, and trims
-can be specified separately in the format \fIread\fR,\fIwrite\fR,\fItrim\fR
-either of which may be empty to leave that value at its default. If a trailing
-comma isn't given, the remainder will inherit the last value set.
-.TP
-.BI blocksize_range \fR=\fPirange[,irange] "\fR,\fB bsrange" \fR=\fPirange[,irange]
-Specify a range of I/O block sizes.  The issued I/O unit will always be a
-multiple of the minimum size, unless \fBblocksize_unaligned\fR is set.  Applies
-to both reads and writes if only one range is given, but can be specified
-separately with a comma separating the values. Example: bsrange=1k-4k,2k-8k.
-Also (see \fBblocksize\fR).
-.TP
-.BI bssplit \fR=\fPstr
-This option allows even finer grained control of the block sizes issued,
-not just even splits between them. With this option, you can weight various
-block sizes for exact control of the issued IO for a job that has mixed
-block sizes. The format of the option is bssplit=blocksize/percentage,
-optionally adding as many definitions as needed separated by a colon.
-Example: bssplit=4k/10:64k/50:32k/40 would issue 50% 64k blocks, 10% 4k
-blocks and 40% 32k blocks. \fBbssplit\fR also supports giving separate
-splits to reads and writes. The format is identical to what the
-\fBbs\fR option accepts, the read and write parts are separated with a
-comma.
-.TP
-.B blocksize_unaligned\fR,\fP bs_unaligned
-If set, any size in \fBblocksize_range\fR may be used.  This typically won't
-work with direct I/O, as that normally requires sector alignment.
-.TP
-.BI blockalign \fR=\fPint[,int] "\fR,\fB ba" \fR=\fPint[,int]
-At what boundary to align random IO offsets. Defaults to the same as 'blocksize'
-the minimum blocksize given.  Minimum alignment is typically 512b
-for using direct IO, though it usually depends on the hardware block size.
-This option is mutually exclusive with using a random map for files, so it
-will turn off that option.
+.B random
+Advise using FADV_RANDOM.
+.RE
+.RE
 .TP
-.BI bs_is_seq_rand \fR=\fPbool
-If this option is set, fio will use the normal read,write blocksize settings as
-sequential,random instead. Any random read or write will use the WRITE
-blocksize settings, and any sequential read or write will use the READ
-blocksize setting.
+.BI write_hint \fR=\fPstr
+Use \fBfcntl\fR\|(2) to advise the kernel what life time to expect
+from a write. Only supported on Linux, as of version 4.13. Accepted
+values are:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B none
+No particular life time associated with this file.
+.TP
+.B short
+Data written to this file has a short life time.
+.TP
+.B medium
+Data written to this file has a medium life time.
+.TP
+.B long
+Data written to this file has a long life time.
+.TP
+.B extreme
+Data written to this file has a very long life time.
+.RE
+.P
+The values are all relative to each other, and no absolute meaning
+should be associated with them.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI offset \fR=\fPint
+Start I/O at the provided offset in the file, given as either a fixed size in
+bytes or a percentage. If a percentage is given, the next \fBblockalign\fR\-ed
+offset will be used. Data before the given offset will not be touched. This
+effectively caps the file size at `real_size \- offset'. Can be combined with
+\fBsize\fR to constrain the start and end range of the I/O workload.
+A percentage can be specified by a number between 1 and 100 followed by '%',
+for example, `offset=20%' to specify 20%.
+.TP
+.BI offset_increment \fR=\fPint
+If this is provided, then the real offset becomes `\fBoffset\fR + \fBoffset_increment\fR
+* thread_number', where the thread number is a counter that starts at 0 and
+is incremented for each sub\-job (i.e. when \fBnumjobs\fR option is
+specified). This option is useful if there are several jobs which are
+intended to operate on a file in parallel disjoint segments, with even
+spacing between the starting points.
+.TP
+.BI number_ios \fR=\fPint
+Fio will normally perform I/Os until it has exhausted the size of the region
+set by \fBsize\fR, or if it exhaust the allocated time (or hits an error
+condition). With this setting, the range/size can be set independently of
+the number of I/Os to perform. When fio reaches this number, it will exit
+normally and report status. Note that this does not extend the amount of I/O
+that will be done, it will only stop fio if this condition is met before
+other end\-of\-job criteria.
+.TP
+.BI fsync \fR=\fPint
+If writing to a file, issue an \fBfsync\fR\|(2) (or its equivalent) of
+the dirty data for every number of blocks given. For example, if you give 32
+as a parameter, fio will sync the file after every 32 writes issued. If fio is
+using non\-buffered I/O, we may not sync the file. The exception is the sg
+I/O engine, which synchronizes the disk cache anyway. Defaults to 0, which
+means fio does not periodically issue and wait for a sync to complete. Also
+see \fBend_fsync\fR and \fBfsync_on_close\fR.
+.TP
+.BI fdatasync \fR=\fPint
+Like \fBfsync\fR but uses \fBfdatasync\fR\|(2) to only sync data and
+not metadata blocks. In Windows, FreeBSD, and DragonFlyBSD there is no
+\fBfdatasync\fR\|(2) so this falls back to using \fBfsync\fR\|(2).
+Defaults to 0, which means fio does not periodically issue and wait for a
+data\-only sync to complete.
+.TP
+.BI write_barrier \fR=\fPint
+Make every N\-th write a barrier write.
+.TP
+.BI sync_file_range \fR=\fPstr:int
+Use \fBsync_file_range\fR\|(2) for every \fIint\fR number of write
+operations. Fio will track range of writes that have happened since the last
+\fBsync_file_range\fR\|(2) call. \fIstr\fR can currently be one or more of:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B wait_before
+SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WAIT_BEFORE
+.TP
+.B write
+SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WRITE
+.TP
+.B wait_after
+SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WRITE_AFTER
+.RE
+.P
+So if you do `sync_file_range=wait_before,write:8', fio would use
+`SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WAIT_BEFORE | SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WRITE' for every 8
+writes. Also see the \fBsync_file_range\fR\|(2) man page. This option is
+Linux specific.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI overwrite \fR=\fPbool
+If true, writes to a file will always overwrite existing data. If the file
+doesn't already exist, it will be created before the write phase begins. If
+the file exists and is large enough for the specified write phase, nothing
+will be done. Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI end_fsync \fR=\fPbool
+If true, \fBfsync\fR\|(2) file contents when a write stage has completed.
+Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI fsync_on_close \fR=\fPbool
+If true, fio will \fBfsync\fR\|(2) a dirty file on close. This differs
+from \fBend_fsync\fR in that it will happen on every file close, not
+just at the end of the job. Default: false.
+.TP
+.BI rwmixread \fR=\fPint
+Percentage of a mixed workload that should be reads. Default: 50.
+.TP
+.BI rwmixwrite \fR=\fPint
+Percentage of a mixed workload that should be writes. If both
+\fBrwmixread\fR and \fBrwmixwrite\fR is given and the values do not
+add up to 100%, the latter of the two will be used to override the
+first. This may interfere with a given rate setting, if fio is asked to
+limit reads or writes to a certain rate. If that is the case, then the
+distribution may be skewed. Default: 50.
+.TP
+.BI random_distribution \fR=\fPstr:float[,str:float][,str:float]
+By default, fio will use a completely uniform random distribution when asked
+to perform random I/O. Sometimes it is useful to skew the distribution in
+specific ways, ensuring that some parts of the data is more hot than others.
+fio includes the following distribution models:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B random
+Uniform random distribution
+.TP
+.B zipf
+Zipf distribution
+.TP
+.B pareto
+Pareto distribution
+.TP
+.B normal
+Normal (Gaussian) distribution
+.TP
+.B zoned
+Zoned random distribution
+.RE
+.P
+When using a \fBzipf\fR or \fBpareto\fR distribution, an input value is also
+needed to define the access pattern. For \fBzipf\fR, this is the `Zipf theta'.
+For \fBpareto\fR, it's the `Pareto power'. Fio includes a test
+program, \fBfio\-genzipf\fR, that can be used visualize what the given input
+values will yield in terms of hit rates. If you wanted to use \fBzipf\fR with
+a `theta' of 1.2, you would use `random_distribution=zipf:1.2' as the
+option. If a non\-uniform model is used, fio will disable use of the random
+map. For the \fBnormal\fR distribution, a normal (Gaussian) deviation is
+supplied as a value between 0 and 100.
+.P
+For a \fBzoned\fR distribution, fio supports specifying percentages of I/O
+access that should fall within what range of the file or device. For
+example, given a criteria of:
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+60% of accesses should be to the first 10%
+.P
+30% of accesses should be to the next 20%
+.P
+8% of accesses should be to the next 30%
+.P
+2% of accesses should be to the next 40%
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
+we can define that through zoning of the random accesses. For the above
+example, the user would do:
+.RS
+.P
+random_distribution=zoned:60/10:30/20:8/30:2/40
+.RE
+.P
+similarly to how \fBbssplit\fR works for setting ranges and percentages
+of block sizes. Like \fBbssplit\fR, it's possible to specify separate
+zones for reads, writes, and trims. If just one set is given, it'll apply to
+all of them.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI percentage_random \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+For a random workload, set how big a percentage should be random. This
+defaults to 100%, in which case the workload is fully random. It can be set
+from anywhere from 0 to 100. Setting it to 0 would make the workload fully
+sequential. Any setting in between will result in a random mix of sequential
+and random I/O, at the given percentages. Comma\-separated values may be
+specified for reads, writes, and trims as described in \fBblocksize\fR.
+.TP
+.BI norandommap
+Normally fio will cover every block of the file when doing random I/O. If
+this option is given, fio will just get a new random offset without looking
+at past I/O history. This means that some blocks may not be read or written,
+and that some blocks may be read/written more than once. If this option is
+used with \fBverify\fR and multiple blocksizes (via \fBbsrange\fR),
+only intact blocks are verified, i.e., partially\-overwritten blocks are
+ignored.
 .TP
-.B zero_buffers
+.BI softrandommap \fR=\fPbool
+See \fBnorandommap\fR. If fio runs with the random block map enabled and
+it fails to allocate the map, if this option is set it will continue without
+a random block map. As coverage will not be as complete as with random maps,
+this option is disabled by default.
+.TP
+.BI random_generator \fR=\fPstr
+Fio supports the following engines for generating I/O offsets for random I/O:
+.RS
+.RS
+.TP
+.B tausworthe
+Strong 2^88 cycle random number generator.
+.TP
+.B lfsr
+Linear feedback shift register generator.
+.TP
+.B tausworthe64
+Strong 64\-bit 2^258 cycle random number generator.
+.RE
+.P
+\fBtausworthe\fR is a strong random number generator, but it requires tracking
+on the side if we want to ensure that blocks are only read or written
+once. \fBlfsr\fR guarantees that we never generate the same offset twice, and
+it's also less computationally expensive. It's not a true random generator,
+however, though for I/O purposes it's typically good enough. \fBlfsr\fR only
+works with single block sizes, not with workloads that use multiple block
+sizes. If used with such a workload, fio may read or write some blocks
+multiple times. The default value is \fBtausworthe\fR, unless the required
+space exceeds 2^32 blocks. If it does, then \fBtausworthe64\fR is
+selected automatically.
+.RE
+.SS "Block size"
+.TP
+.BI blocksize \fR=\fPint[,int][,int] "\fR,\fB bs" \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+The block size in bytes used for I/O units. Default: 4096. A single value
+applies to reads, writes, and trims. Comma\-separated values may be
+specified for reads, writes, and trims. A value not terminated in a comma
+applies to subsequent types. Examples:
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+bs=256k        means 256k for reads, writes and trims.
+.P
+bs=8k,32k      means 8k for reads, 32k for writes and trims.
+.P
+bs=8k,32k,     means 8k for reads, 32k for writes, and default for trims.
+.P
+bs=,8k         means default for reads, 8k for writes and trims.
+.P
+bs=,8k,        means default for reads, 8k for writes, and default for trims.
+.PD
+.RE
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI blocksize_range \fR=\fPirange[,irange][,irange] "\fR,\fB bsrange" \fR=\fPirange[,irange][,irange]
+A range of block sizes in bytes for I/O units. The issued I/O unit will
+always be a multiple of the minimum size, unless
+\fBblocksize_unaligned\fR is set.
+Comma\-separated ranges may be specified for reads, writes, and trims as
+described in \fBblocksize\fR. Example:
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+bsrange=1k\-4k,2k\-8k
+.RE
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI bssplit \fR=\fPstr[,str][,str]
+Sometimes you want even finer grained control of the block sizes issued, not
+just an even split between them. This option allows you to weight various
+block sizes, so that you are able to define a specific amount of block sizes
+issued. The format for this option is:
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+bssplit=blocksize/percentage:blocksize/percentage
+.RE
+.P
+for as many block sizes as needed. So if you want to define a workload that
+has 50% 64k blocks, 10% 4k blocks, and 40% 32k blocks, you would write:
+.RS
+.P
+bssplit=4k/10:64k/50:32k/40
+.RE
+.P
+Ordering does not matter. If the percentage is left blank, fio will fill in
+the remaining values evenly. So a bssplit option like this one:
+.RS
+.P
+bssplit=4k/50:1k/:32k/
+.RE
+.P
+would have 50% 4k ios, and 25% 1k and 32k ios. The percentages always add up
+to 100, if bssplit is given a range that adds up to more, it will error out.
+.P
+Comma\-separated values may be specified for reads, writes, and trims as
+described in \fBblocksize\fR.
+.P
+If you want a workload that has 50% 2k reads and 50% 4k reads, while having
+90% 4k writes and 10% 8k writes, you would specify:
+.RS
+.P
+bssplit=2k/50:4k/50,4k/90,8k/10
+.RE
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI blocksize_unaligned "\fR,\fB bs_unaligned"
+If set, fio will issue I/O units with any size within
+\fBblocksize_range\fR, not just multiples of the minimum size. This
+typically won't work with direct I/O, as that normally requires sector
+alignment.
+.TP
+.BI bs_is_seq_rand \fR=\fPbool
+If this option is set, fio will use the normal read,write blocksize settings
+as sequential,random blocksize settings instead. Any random read or write
+will use the WRITE blocksize settings, and any sequential read or write will
+use the READ blocksize settings.
+.TP
+.BI blockalign \fR=\fPint[,int][,int] "\fR,\fB ba" \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+Boundary to which fio will align random I/O units. Default:
+\fBblocksize\fR. Minimum alignment is typically 512b for using direct
+I/O, though it usually depends on the hardware block size. This option is
+mutually exclusive with using a random map for files, so it will turn off
+that option. Comma\-separated values may be specified for reads, writes, and
+trims as described in \fBblocksize\fR.
+.SS "Buffers and memory"
+.TP
+.BI zero_buffers
 Initialize buffers with all zeros. Default: fill buffers with random data.
 .TP
-.B refill_buffers
-If this option is given, fio will refill the IO buffers on every submit. The
-default is to only fill it at init time and reuse that data. Only makes sense
-if zero_buffers isn't specified, naturally. If data verification is enabled,
-refill_buffers is also automatically enabled.
+.BI refill_buffers
+If this option is given, fio will refill the I/O buffers on every
+submit. The default is to only fill it at init time and reuse that
+data. Only makes sense if zero_buffers isn't specified, naturally. If data
+verification is enabled, \fBrefill_buffers\fR is also automatically enabled.
 .TP
 .BI scramble_buffers \fR=\fPbool
 If \fBrefill_buffers\fR is too costly and the target is using data
-deduplication, then setting this option will slightly modify the IO buffer
-contents to defeat normal de-dupe attempts. This is not enough to defeat
-more clever block compression attempts, but it will stop naive dedupe
-of blocks. Default: true.
+deduplication, then setting this option will slightly modify the I/O buffer
+contents to defeat normal de\-dupe attempts. This is not enough to defeat
+more clever block compression attempts, but it will stop naive dedupe of
+blocks. Default: true.
 .TP
 .BI buffer_compress_percentage \fR=\fPint
-If this is set, then fio will attempt to provide IO buffer content (on WRITEs)
-that compress to the specified level. Fio does this by providing a mix of
-random data and a fixed pattern. The fixed pattern is either zeroes, or the
-pattern specified by \fBbuffer_pattern\fR. If the pattern option is used, it
-might skew the compression ratio slightly. Note that this is per block size
-unit, for file/disk wide compression level that matches this setting. Note
-that this is per block size unit, for file/disk wide compression level that
-matches this setting, you'll also want to set refill_buffers.
+If this is set, then fio will attempt to provide I/O buffer content (on
+WRITEs) that compresses to the specified level. Fio does this by providing a
+mix of random data and a fixed pattern. The fixed pattern is either zeros,
+or the pattern specified by \fBbuffer_pattern\fR. If the pattern option
+is used, it might skew the compression ratio slightly. Note that this is per
+block size unit, for file/disk wide compression level that matches this
+setting, you'll also want to set \fBrefill_buffers\fR.
 .TP
 .BI buffer_compress_chunk \fR=\fPint
-See \fBbuffer_compress_percentage\fR. This setting allows fio to manage how
-big the ranges of random data and zeroed data is. Without this set, fio will
-provide \fBbuffer_compress_percentage\fR of blocksize random data, followed by
-the remaining zeroed. With this set to some chunk size smaller than the block
-size, fio can alternate random and zeroed data throughout the IO buffer.
+See \fBbuffer_compress_percentage\fR. This setting allows fio to manage
+how big the ranges of random data and zeroed data is. Without this set, fio
+will provide \fBbuffer_compress_percentage\fR of blocksize random data,
+followed by the remaining zeroed. With this set to some chunk size smaller
+than the block size, fio can alternate random and zeroed data throughout the
+I/O buffer.
 .TP
 .BI buffer_pattern \fR=\fPstr
-If set, fio will fill the IO buffers with this pattern. If not set, the contents
-of IO buffers is defined by the other options related to buffer contents. The
-setting can be any pattern of bytes, and can be prefixed with 0x for hex
-values. It may also be a string, where the string must then be wrapped with
-"", e.g.:
-.RS
+If set, fio will fill the I/O buffers with this pattern or with the contents
+of a file. If not set, the contents of I/O buffers are defined by the other
+options related to buffer contents. The setting can be any pattern of bytes,
+and can be prefixed with 0x for hex values. It may also be a string, where
+the string must then be wrapped with "". Or it may also be a filename,
+where the filename must be wrapped with '' in which case the file is
+opened and read. Note that not all the file contents will be read if that
+would cause the buffers to overflow. So, for example:
 .RS
-\fBbuffer_pattern\fR="abcd"
 .RS
-or
-.RE
-\fBbuffer_pattern\fR=-12
-.RS
-or
-.RE
-\fBbuffer_pattern\fR=0xdeadface
+.P
+.PD 0
+buffer_pattern='filename'
+.P
+or:
+.P
+buffer_pattern="abcd"
+.P
+or:
+.P
+buffer_pattern=\-12
+.P
+or:
+.P
+buffer_pattern=0xdeadface
+.PD
 .RE
-.LP
+.P
 Also you can combine everything together in any order:
-.LP
 .RS
-\fBbuffer_pattern\fR=0xdeadface"abcd"-12
+.P
+buffer_pattern=0xdeadface"abcd"\-12'filename'
 .RE
 .RE
 .TP
 .BI dedupe_percentage \fR=\fPint
-If set, fio will generate this percentage of identical buffers when writing.
-These buffers will be naturally dedupable. The contents of the buffers depend
-on what other buffer compression settings have been set. It's possible to have
-the individual buffers either fully compressible, or not at all. This option
-only controls the distribution of unique buffers.
+If set, fio will generate this percentage of identical buffers when
+writing. These buffers will be naturally dedupable. The contents of the
+buffers depend on what other buffer compression settings have been set. It's
+possible to have the individual buffers either fully compressible, or not at
+all. This option only controls the distribution of unique buffers.
 .TP
-.BI nrfiles \fR=\fPint
-Number of files to use for this job.  Default: 1.
+.BI invalidate \fR=\fPbool
+Invalidate the buffer/page cache parts of the files to be used prior to
+starting I/O if the platform and file type support it. Defaults to true.
+This will be ignored if \fBpre_read\fR is also specified for the
+same job.
 .TP
-.BI openfiles \fR=\fPint
-Number of files to keep open at the same time.  Default: \fBnrfiles\fR.
+.BI sync \fR=\fPbool
+Use synchronous I/O for buffered writes. For the majority of I/O engines,
+this means using O_SYNC. Default: false.
 .TP
-.BI file_service_type \fR=\fPstr
-Defines how files to service are selected.  The following types are defined:
+.BI iomem \fR=\fPstr "\fR,\fP mem" \fR=\fPstr
+Fio can use various types of memory as the I/O unit buffer. The allowed
+values are:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
-.B random
-Choose a file at random.
+.B malloc
+Use memory from \fBmalloc\fR\|(3) as the buffers. Default memory type.
 .TP
-.B roundrobin
-Round robin over opened files (default).
+.B shm
+Use shared memory as the buffers. Allocated through \fBshmget\fR\|(2).
 .TP
-.B sequential
-Do each file in the set sequentially.
+.B shmhuge
+Same as \fBshm\fR, but use huge pages as backing.
+.TP
+.B mmap
+Use \fBmmap\fR\|(2) to allocate buffers. May either be anonymous memory, or can
+be file backed if a filename is given after the option. The format
+is `mem=mmap:/path/to/file'.
+.TP
+.B mmaphuge
+Use a memory mapped huge file as the buffer backing. Append filename
+after mmaphuge, ala `mem=mmaphuge:/hugetlbfs/file'.
+.TP
+.B mmapshared
+Same as \fBmmap\fR, but use a MMAP_SHARED mapping.
+.TP
+.B cudamalloc
+Use GPU memory as the buffers for GPUDirect RDMA benchmark.
+The \fBioengine\fR must be \fBrdma\fR.
 .RE
 .P
-The number of I/Os to issue before switching to a new file can be specified by
-appending `:\fIint\fR' to the service type.
+The area allocated is a function of the maximum allowed bs size for the job,
+multiplied by the I/O depth given. Note that for \fBshmhuge\fR and
+\fBmmaphuge\fR to work, the system must have free huge pages allocated. This
+can normally be checked and set by reading/writing
+`/proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages' on a Linux system. Fio assumes a huge page
+is 4MiB in size. So to calculate the number of huge pages you need for a
+given job file, add up the I/O depth of all jobs (normally one unless
+\fBiodepth\fR is used) and multiply by the maximum bs set. Then divide
+that number by the huge page size. You can see the size of the huge pages in
+`/proc/meminfo'. If no huge pages are allocated by having a non\-zero
+number in `nr_hugepages', using \fBmmaphuge\fR or \fBshmhuge\fR will fail. Also
+see \fBhugepage\-size\fR.
+.P
+\fBmmaphuge\fR also needs to have hugetlbfs mounted and the file location
+should point there. So if it's mounted in `/huge', you would use
+`mem=mmaphuge:/huge/somefile'.
 .RE
 .TP
+.BI iomem_align \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fP mem_align" \fR=\fPint
+This indicates the memory alignment of the I/O memory buffers. Note that
+the given alignment is applied to the first I/O unit buffer, if using
+\fBiodepth\fR the alignment of the following buffers are given by the
+\fBbs\fR used. In other words, if using a \fBbs\fR that is a
+multiple of the page sized in the system, all buffers will be aligned to
+this value. If using a \fBbs\fR that is not page aligned, the alignment
+of subsequent I/O memory buffers is the sum of the \fBiomem_align\fR and
+\fBbs\fR used.
+.TP
+.BI hugepage\-size \fR=\fPint
+Defines the size of a huge page. Must at least be equal to the system
+setting, see `/proc/meminfo'. Defaults to 4MiB. Should probably
+always be a multiple of megabytes, so using `hugepage\-size=Xm' is the
+preferred way to set this to avoid setting a non\-pow\-2 bad value.
+.TP
+.BI lockmem \fR=\fPint
+Pin the specified amount of memory with \fBmlock\fR\|(2). Can be used to
+simulate a smaller amount of memory. The amount specified is per worker.
+.SS "I/O size"
+.TP
+.BI size \fR=\fPint
+The total size of file I/O for each thread of this job. Fio will run until
+this many bytes has been transferred, unless runtime is limited by other options
+(such as \fBruntime\fR, for instance, or increased/decreased by \fBio_size\fR).
+Fio will divide this size between the available files determined by options
+such as \fBnrfiles\fR, \fBfilename\fR, unless \fBfilesize\fR is
+specified by the job. If the result of division happens to be 0, the size is
+set to the physical size of the given files or devices if they exist.
+If this option is not specified, fio will use the full size of the given
+files or devices. If the files do not exist, size must be given. It is also
+possible to give size as a percentage between 1 and 100. If `size=20%' is
+given, fio will use 20% of the full size of the given files or devices.
+Can be combined with \fBoffset\fR to constrain the start and end range
+that I/O will be done within.
+.TP
+.BI io_size \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fB io_limit" \fR=\fPint
+Normally fio operates within the region set by \fBsize\fR, which means
+that the \fBsize\fR option sets both the region and size of I/O to be
+performed. Sometimes that is not what you want. With this option, it is
+possible to define just the amount of I/O that fio should do. For instance,
+if \fBsize\fR is set to 20GiB and \fBio_size\fR is set to 5GiB, fio
+will perform I/O within the first 20GiB but exit when 5GiB have been
+done. The opposite is also possible \-\- if \fBsize\fR is set to 20GiB,
+and \fBio_size\fR is set to 40GiB, then fio will do 40GiB of I/O within
+the 0..20GiB region.
+.TP
+.BI filesize \fR=\fPirange(int)
+Individual file sizes. May be a range, in which case fio will select sizes
+for files at random within the given range and limited to \fBsize\fR in
+total (if that is given). If not given, each created file is the same size.
+This option overrides \fBsize\fR in terms of file size, which means
+this value is used as a fixed size or possible range of each file.
+.TP
+.BI file_append \fR=\fPbool
+Perform I/O after the end of the file. Normally fio will operate within the
+size of a file. If this option is set, then fio will append to the file
+instead. This has identical behavior to setting \fBoffset\fR to the size
+of a file. This option is ignored on non\-regular files.
+.TP
+.BI fill_device \fR=\fPbool "\fR,\fB fill_fs" \fR=\fPbool
+Sets size to something really large and waits for ENOSPC (no space left on
+device) as the terminating condition. Only makes sense with sequential
+write. For a read workload, the mount point will be filled first then I/O
+started on the result. This option doesn't make sense if operating on a raw
+device node, since the size of that is already known by the file system.
+Additionally, writing beyond end\-of\-device will not return ENOSPC there.
+.SS "I/O engine"
+.TP
 .BI ioengine \fR=\fPstr
-Defines how the job issues I/O The following types are defined:
+Defines how the job issues I/O to the file. The following types are defined:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
 .B sync
-Basic \fBread\fR\|(2) or \fBwrite\fR\|(2) I/O.  \fBfseek\fR\|(2) is used to
-position the I/O location.
+Basic \fBread\fR\|(2) or \fBwrite\fR\|(2)
+I/O. \fBlseek\fR\|(2) is used to position the I/O location.
+See \fBfsync\fR and \fBfdatasync\fR for syncing write I/Os.
 .TP
 .B psync
-Basic \fBpread\fR\|(2) or \fBpwrite\fR\|(2) I/O.
+Basic \fBpread\fR\|(2) or \fBpwrite\fR\|(2) I/O. Default on
+all supported operating systems except for Windows.
 .TP
 .B vsync
-Basic \fBreadv\fR\|(2) or \fBwritev\fR\|(2) I/O. Will emulate queuing by
-coalescing adjacent IOs into a single submission.
+Basic \fBreadv\fR\|(2) or \fBwritev\fR\|(2) I/O. Will emulate
+queuing by coalescing adjacent I/Os into a single submission.
 .TP
 .B pvsync
 Basic \fBpreadv\fR\|(2) or \fBpwritev\fR\|(2) I/O.
@@ -595,470 +1436,570 @@ Basic \fBpreadv\fR\|(2) or \fBpwritev\fR\|(2) I/O.
 Basic \fBpreadv2\fR\|(2) or \fBpwritev2\fR\|(2) I/O.
 .TP
 .B libaio
-Linux native asynchronous I/O. This ioengine defines engine specific options.
+Linux native asynchronous I/O. Note that Linux may only support
+queued behavior with non\-buffered I/O (set `direct=1' or
+`buffered=0').
+This engine defines engine specific options.
 .TP
 .B posixaio
-POSIX asynchronous I/O using \fBaio_read\fR\|(3) and \fBaio_write\fR\|(3).
+POSIX asynchronous I/O using \fBaio_read\fR\|(3) and
+\fBaio_write\fR\|(3).
 .TP
 .B solarisaio
 Solaris native asynchronous I/O.
 .TP
 .B windowsaio
-Windows native asynchronous I/O.
+Windows native asynchronous I/O. Default on Windows.
 .TP
 .B mmap
-File is memory mapped with \fBmmap\fR\|(2) and data copied using
-\fBmemcpy\fR\|(3).
+File is memory mapped with \fBmmap\fR\|(2) and data copied
+to/from using \fBmemcpy\fR\|(3).
 .TP
 .B splice
-\fBsplice\fR\|(2) is used to transfer the data and \fBvmsplice\fR\|(2) to
-transfer data from user-space to the kernel.
-.TP
-.B syslet-rw
-Use the syslet system calls to make regular read/write asynchronous.
+\fBsplice\fR\|(2) is used to transfer the data and
+\fBvmsplice\fR\|(2) to transfer data from user space to the
+kernel.
 .TP
 .B sg
-SCSI generic sg v3 I/O. May be either synchronous using the SG_IO ioctl, or if
-the target is an sg character device, we use \fBread\fR\|(2) and
-\fBwrite\fR\|(2) for asynchronous I/O.
+SCSI generic sg v3 I/O. May either be synchronous using the SG_IO
+ioctl, or if the target is an sg character device we use
+\fBread\fR\|(2) and \fBwrite\fR\|(2) for asynchronous
+I/O. Requires \fBfilename\fR option to specify either block or
+character devices.
 .TP
 .B null
-Doesn't transfer any data, just pretends to.  Mainly used to exercise \fBfio\fR
-itself and for debugging and testing purposes.
+Doesn't transfer any data, just pretends to. This is mainly used to
+exercise fio itself and for debugging/testing purposes.
 .TP
 .B net
-Transfer over the network.  The protocol to be used can be defined with the
-\fBprotocol\fR parameter.  Depending on the protocol, \fBfilename\fR,
-\fBhostname\fR, \fBport\fR, or \fBlisten\fR must be specified.
-This ioengine defines engine specific options.
+Transfer over the network to given `host:port'. Depending on the
+\fBprotocol\fR used, the \fBhostname\fR, \fBport\fR,
+\fBlisten\fR and \fBfilename\fR options are used to specify
+what sort of connection to make, while the \fBprotocol\fR option
+determines which protocol will be used. This engine defines engine
+specific options.
 .TP
 .B netsplice
-Like \fBnet\fR, but uses \fBsplice\fR\|(2) and \fBvmsplice\fR\|(2) to map data
-and send/receive. This ioengine defines engine specific options.
+Like \fBnet\fR, but uses \fBsplice\fR\|(2) and
+\fBvmsplice\fR\|(2) to map data and send/receive.
+This engine defines engine specific options.
 .TP
 .B cpuio
-Doesn't transfer any data, but burns CPU cycles according to \fBcpuload\fR and
-\fBcpucycles\fR parameters.
+Doesn't transfer any data, but burns CPU cycles according to the
+\fBcpuload\fR and \fBcpuchunks\fR options. Setting
+\fBcpuload\fR\=85 will cause that job to do nothing but burn 85%
+of the CPU. In case of SMP machines, use `numjobs=<nr_of_cpu>'
+to get desired CPU usage, as the cpuload only loads a
+single CPU at the desired rate. A job never finishes unless there is
+at least one non\-cpuio job.
 .TP
 .B guasi
-The GUASI I/O engine is the Generic Userspace Asynchronous Syscall Interface
-approach to asynchronous I/O.
-.br
-See <http://www.xmailserver.org/guasi\-lib.html>.
+The GUASI I/O engine is the Generic Userspace Asyncronous Syscall
+Interface approach to async I/O. See \fIhttp://www.xmailserver.org/guasi\-lib.html\fR
+for more info on GUASI.
 .TP
 .B rdma
-The RDMA I/O engine supports both RDMA memory semantics (RDMA_WRITE/RDMA_READ)
-and channel semantics (Send/Recv) for the InfiniBand, RoCE and iWARP protocols.
-.TP
-.B external
-Loads an external I/O engine object file.  Append the engine filename as
-`:\fIenginepath\fR'.
+The RDMA I/O engine supports both RDMA memory semantics
+(RDMA_WRITE/RDMA_READ) and channel semantics (Send/Recv) for the
+InfiniBand, RoCE and iWARP protocols.
 .TP
 .B falloc
-   IO engine that does regular linux native fallocate call to simulate data
-transfer as fio ioengine
-.br
-  DDIR_READ  does fallocate(,mode = FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE,)
-.br
-  DIR_WRITE does fallocate(,mode = 0)
-.br
-  DDIR_TRIM does fallocate(,mode = FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE|FALLOC_FL_PUNCH_HOLE)
+I/O engine that does regular fallocate to simulate data transfer as
+fio ioengine.
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
+DDIR_READ      does fallocate(,mode = FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE,).
+.P
+DIR_WRITE      does fallocate(,mode = 0).
+.P
+DDIR_TRIM      does fallocate(,mode = FALLOC_FL_KEEP_SIZE|FALLOC_FL_PUNCH_HOLE).
+.PD
+.RE
+.TP
+.B ftruncate
+I/O engine that sends \fBftruncate\fR\|(2) operations in response
+to write (DDIR_WRITE) events. Each ftruncate issued sets the file's
+size to the current block offset. \fBblocksize\fR is ignored.
 .TP
 .B e4defrag
-IO engine that does regular EXT4_IOC_MOVE_EXT ioctls to simulate defragment activity
-request to DDIR_WRITE event
+I/O engine that does regular EXT4_IOC_MOVE_EXT ioctls to simulate
+defragment activity in request to DDIR_WRITE event.
 .TP
 .B rbd
-IO engine supporting direct access to Ceph Rados Block Devices (RBD) via librbd
-without the need to use the kernel rbd driver. This ioengine defines engine specific
-options.
+I/O engine supporting direct access to Ceph Rados Block Devices
+(RBD) via librbd without the need to use the kernel rbd driver. This
+ioengine defines engine specific options.
 .TP
 .B gfapi
-Using Glusterfs libgfapi sync interface to direct access to Glusterfs volumes without
-having to go through FUSE. This ioengine defines engine specific
-options.
+Using GlusterFS libgfapi sync interface to direct access to
+GlusterFS volumes without having to go through FUSE. This ioengine
+defines engine specific options.
 .TP
 .B gfapi_async
-Using Glusterfs libgfapi async interface to direct access to Glusterfs volumes without
-having to go through FUSE. This ioengine defines engine specific
-options.
+Using GlusterFS libgfapi async interface to direct access to
+GlusterFS volumes without having to go through FUSE. This ioengine
+defines engine specific options.
 .TP
 .B libhdfs
-Read and write through Hadoop (HDFS).  The \fBfilename\fR option is used to
-specify host,port of the hdfs name-node to connect. This engine interprets
-offsets a little differently. In HDFS, files once created cannot be modified.
-So random writes are not possible. To imitate this, libhdfs engine expects
-bunch of small files to be created over HDFS, and engine will randomly pick a
-file out of those files based on the offset generated by fio backend. (see the
-example job file to create such files, use rw=write option). Please note, you
-might want to set necessary environment variables to work with hdfs/libhdfs
-properly.
+Read and write through Hadoop (HDFS). The \fBfilename\fR option
+is used to specify host,port of the hdfs name\-node to connect. This
+engine interprets offsets a little differently. In HDFS, files once
+created cannot be modified so random writes are not possible. To
+imitate this the libhdfs engine expects a bunch of small files to be
+created over HDFS and will randomly pick a file from them
+based on the offset generated by fio backend (see the example
+job file to create such files, use `rw=write' option). Please
+note, it may be necessary to set environment variables to work
+with HDFS/libhdfs properly. Each job uses its own connection to
+HDFS.
 .TP
 .B mtd
-Read, write and erase an MTD character device (e.g., /dev/mtd0). Discards are
-treated as erases. Depending on the underlying device type, the I/O may have
-to go in a certain pattern, e.g., on NAND, writing sequentially to erase blocks
-and discarding before overwriting. The writetrim mode works well for this
+Read, write and erase an MTD character device (e.g.,
+`/dev/mtd0'). Discards are treated as erases. Depending on the
+underlying device type, the I/O may have to go in a certain pattern,
+e.g., on NAND, writing sequentially to erase blocks and discarding
+before overwriting. The \fBtrimwrite\fR mode works well for this
 constraint.
 .TP
 .B pmemblk
-Read and write through the NVML libpmemblk interface.
-.RE
-.P
-.RE
+Read and write using filesystem DAX to a file on a filesystem
+mounted with DAX on a persistent memory device through the NVML
+libpmemblk library.
 .TP
-.BI iodepth \fR=\fPint
-Number of I/O units to keep in flight against the file. Note that increasing
-iodepth beyond 1 will not affect synchronous ioengines (except for small
-degress when verify_async is in use). Even async engines may impose OS
-restrictions causing the desired depth not to be achieved.  This may happen on
-Linux when using libaio and not setting \fBdirect\fR=1, since buffered IO is
-not async on that OS. Keep an eye on the IO depth distribution in the
-fio output to verify that the achieved depth is as expected. Default: 1.
-.TP
-.BI iodepth_batch \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fP iodepth_batch_submit" \fR=\fPint
-This defines how many pieces of IO to submit at once. It defaults to 1
-which means that we submit each IO as soon as it is available, but can
-be raised to submit bigger batches of IO at the time. If it is set to 0
-the \fBiodepth\fR value will be used.
+.B dev\-dax
+Read and write using device DAX to a persistent memory device (e.g.,
+/dev/dax0.0) through the NVML libpmem library.
 .TP
-.BI iodepth_batch_complete_min \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fP iodepth_batch_complete" \fR=\fPint
-This defines how many pieces of IO to retrieve at once. It defaults to 1 which
- means that we'll ask for a minimum of 1 IO in the retrieval process from the
-kernel. The IO retrieval will go on until we hit the limit set by
-\fBiodepth_low\fR. If this variable is set to 0, then fio will always check for
-completed events before queuing more IO. This helps reduce IO latency, at the
-cost of more retrieval system calls.
+.B external
+Prefix to specify loading an external I/O engine object file. Append
+the engine filename, e.g. `ioengine=external:/tmp/foo.o' to load
+ioengine `foo.o' in `/tmp'. The path can be either
+absolute or relative. See `engines/skeleton_external.c' in the fio source for
+details of writing an external I/O engine.
+.SS "I/O engine specific parameters"
+In addition, there are some parameters which are only valid when a specific
+\fBioengine\fR is in use. These are used identically to normal parameters,
+with the caveat that when used on the command line, they must come after the
+\fBioengine\fR that defines them is selected.
 .TP
-.BI iodepth_batch_complete_max \fR=\fPint
-This defines maximum pieces of IO to
-retrieve at once. This variable should be used along with
-\fBiodepth_batch_complete_min\fR=int variable, specifying the range
-of min and max amount of IO which should be retrieved. By default
-it is equal to \fBiodepth_batch_complete_min\fR value.
-
-Example #1:
-.RS
-.RS
-\fBiodepth_batch_complete_min\fR=1
-.LP
-\fBiodepth_batch_complete_max\fR=<iodepth>
-.RE
-
-which means that we will retrieve at leat 1 IO and up to the
-whole submitted queue depth. If none of IO has been completed
-yet, we will wait.
-
-Example #2:
-.RS
-\fBiodepth_batch_complete_min\fR=0
-.LP
-\fBiodepth_batch_complete_max\fR=<iodepth>
-.RE
-
-which means that we can retrieve up to the whole submitted
-queue depth, but if none of IO has been completed yet, we will
-NOT wait and immediately exit the system call. In this example
-we simply do polling.
-.RE
+.BI (libaio)userspace_reap
+Normally, with the libaio engine in use, fio will use the
+\fBio_getevents\fR\|(3) system call to reap newly returned events. With
+this flag turned on, the AIO ring will be read directly from user\-space to
+reap events. The reaping mode is only enabled when polling for a minimum of
+0 events (e.g. when `iodepth_batch_complete=0').
 .TP
-.BI iodepth_low \fR=\fPint
-Low watermark indicating when to start filling the queue again.  Default:
-\fBiodepth\fR.
+.BI (pvsync2)hipri
+Set RWF_HIPRI on I/O, indicating to the kernel that it's of higher priority
+than normal.
 .TP
-.BI io_submit_mode \fR=\fPstr
-This option controls how fio submits the IO to the IO engine. The default is
-\fBinline\fR, which means that the fio job threads submit and reap IO directly.
-If set to \fBoffload\fR, the job threads will offload IO submission to a
-dedicated pool of IO threads. This requires some coordination and thus has a
-bit of extra overhead, especially for lower queue depth IO where it can
-increase latencies. The benefit is that fio can manage submission rates
-independently of the device completion rates. This avoids skewed latency
-reporting if IO gets back up on the device side (the coordinated omission
-problem).
+.BI (pvsync2)hipri_percentage
+When hipri is set this determines the probability of a pvsync2 I/O being high
+priority. The default is 100%.
 .TP
-.BI direct \fR=\fPbool
-If true, use non-buffered I/O (usually O_DIRECT).  Default: false.
+.BI (cpuio)cpuload \fR=\fPint
+Attempt to use the specified percentage of CPU cycles. This is a mandatory
+option when using cpuio I/O engine.
 .TP
-.BI atomic \fR=\fPbool
-If value is true, attempt to use atomic direct IO. Atomic writes are guaranteed
-to be stable once acknowledged by the operating system. Only Linux supports
-O_ATOMIC right now.
+.BI (cpuio)cpuchunks \fR=\fPint
+Split the load into cycles of the given time. In microseconds.
 .TP
-.BI buffered \fR=\fPbool
-If true, use buffered I/O.  This is the opposite of the \fBdirect\fR parameter.
-Default: true.
+.BI (cpuio)exit_on_io_done \fR=\fPbool
+Detect when I/O threads are done, then exit.
 .TP
-.BI offset \fR=\fPint
-Offset in the file to start I/O. Data before the offset will not be touched.
+.BI (libhdfs)namenode \fR=\fPstr
+The hostname or IP address of a HDFS cluster namenode to contact.
 .TP
-.BI offset_increment \fR=\fPint
-If this is provided, then the real offset becomes the
-offset + offset_increment * thread_number, where the thread number is a
-counter that starts at 0 and is incremented for each sub-job (i.e. when
-numjobs option is specified). This option is useful if there are several jobs
-which are intended to operate on a file in parallel disjoint segments, with
-even spacing between the starting points.
+.BI (libhdfs)port
+The listening port of the HFDS cluster namenode.
 .TP
-.BI number_ios \fR=\fPint
-Fio will normally perform IOs until it has exhausted the size of the region
-set by \fBsize\fR, or if it exhaust the allocated time (or hits an error
-condition). With this setting, the range/size can be set independently of
-the number of IOs to perform. When fio reaches this number, it will exit
-normally and report status. Note that this does not extend the amount
-of IO that will be done, it will only stop fio if this condition is met
-before other end-of-job criteria.
+.BI (netsplice,net)port
+The TCP or UDP port to bind to or connect to. If this is used with
+\fBnumjobs\fR to spawn multiple instances of the same job type, then
+this will be the starting port number since fio will use a range of
+ports.
 .TP
-.BI fsync \fR=\fPint
-How many I/Os to perform before issuing an \fBfsync\fR\|(2) of dirty data.  If
-0, don't sync.  Default: 0.
+.BI (netsplice,net)hostname \fR=\fPstr
+The hostname or IP address to use for TCP or UDP based I/O. If the job is
+a TCP listener or UDP reader, the hostname is not used and must be omitted
+unless it is a valid UDP multicast address.
 .TP
-.BI fdatasync \fR=\fPint
-Like \fBfsync\fR, but uses \fBfdatasync\fR\|(2) instead to only sync the
-data parts of the file. Default: 0.
+.BI (netsplice,net)interface \fR=\fPstr
+The IP address of the network interface used to send or receive UDP
+multicast.
 .TP
-.BI write_barrier \fR=\fPint
-Make every Nth write a barrier write.
+.BI (netsplice,net)ttl \fR=\fPint
+Time\-to\-live value for outgoing UDP multicast packets. Default: 1.
 .TP
-.BI sync_file_range \fR=\fPstr:int
-Use \fBsync_file_range\fR\|(2) for every \fRval\fP number of write operations. Fio will
-track range of writes that have happened since the last \fBsync_file_range\fR\|(2) call.
-\fRstr\fP can currently be one or more of:
+.BI (netsplice,net)nodelay \fR=\fPbool
+Set TCP_NODELAY on TCP connections.
+.TP
+.BI (netsplice,net)protocol \fR=\fPstr "\fR,\fP proto" \fR=\fPstr
+The network protocol to use. Accepted values are:
+.RS
 .RS
 .TP
-.B wait_before
-SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WAIT_BEFORE
+.B tcp
+Transmission control protocol.
 .TP
-.B write
-SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WRITE
+.B tcpv6
+Transmission control protocol V6.
 .TP
-.B wait_after
-SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WRITE
+.B udp
+User datagram protocol.
 .TP
+.B udpv6
+User datagram protocol V6.
+.TP
+.B unix
+UNIX domain socket.
 .RE
 .P
-So if you do sync_file_range=wait_before,write:8, fio would use
-\fBSYNC_FILE_RANGE_WAIT_BEFORE | SYNC_FILE_RANGE_WRITE\fP for every 8 writes.
-Also see the \fBsync_file_range\fR\|(2) man page.  This option is Linux specific.
+When the protocol is TCP or UDP, the port must also be given, as well as the
+hostname if the job is a TCP listener or UDP reader. For unix sockets, the
+normal \fBfilename\fR option should be used and the port is invalid.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI (netsplice,net)listen
+For TCP network connections, tell fio to listen for incoming connections
+rather than initiating an outgoing connection. The \fBhostname\fR must
+be omitted if this option is used.
+.TP
+.BI (netsplice,net)pingpong
+Normally a network writer will just continue writing data, and a network
+reader will just consume packages. If `pingpong=1' is set, a writer will
+send its normal payload to the reader, then wait for the reader to send the
+same payload back. This allows fio to measure network latencies. The
+submission and completion latencies then measure local time spent sending or
+receiving, and the completion latency measures how long it took for the
+other end to receive and send back. For UDP multicast traffic
+`pingpong=1' should only be set for a single reader when multiple readers
+are listening to the same address.
+.TP
+.BI (netsplice,net)window_size \fR=\fPint
+Set the desired socket buffer size for the connection.
 .TP
-.BI overwrite \fR=\fPbool
-If writing, setup the file first and do overwrites.  Default: false.
+.BI (netsplice,net)mss \fR=\fPint
+Set the TCP maximum segment size (TCP_MAXSEG).
 .TP
-.BI end_fsync \fR=\fPbool
-Sync file contents when a write stage has completed.  Default: false.
+.BI (e4defrag)donorname \fR=\fPstr
+File will be used as a block donor (swap extents between files).
 .TP
-.BI fsync_on_close \fR=\fPbool
-If true, sync file contents on close.  This differs from \fBend_fsync\fR in that
-it will happen on every close, not just at the end of the job.  Default: false.
+.BI (e4defrag)inplace \fR=\fPint
+Configure donor file blocks allocation strategy:
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.BI rwmixread \fR=\fPint
-Percentage of a mixed workload that should be reads. Default: 50.
+.B 0
+Default. Preallocate donor's file on init.
 .TP
-.BI rwmixwrite \fR=\fPint
-Percentage of a mixed workload that should be writes.  If \fBrwmixread\fR and
-\fBrwmixwrite\fR are given and do not sum to 100%, the latter of the two
-overrides the first. This may interfere with a given rate setting, if fio is
-asked to limit reads or writes to a certain rate. If that is the case, then
-the distribution may be skewed. Default: 50.
+.B 1
+Allocate space immediately inside defragment event, and free right
+after event.
+.RE
+.RE
 .TP
-.BI random_distribution \fR=\fPstr:float
-By default, fio will use a completely uniform random distribution when asked
-to perform random IO. Sometimes it is useful to skew the distribution in
-specific ways, ensuring that some parts of the data is more hot than others.
-Fio includes the following distribution models:
-.RS
+.BI (rbd)clustername \fR=\fPstr
+Specifies the name of the Ceph cluster.
 .TP
-.B random
-Uniform random distribution
+.BI (rbd)rbdname \fR=\fPstr
+Specifies the name of the RBD.
 .TP
-.B zipf
-Zipf distribution
+.BI (rbd)pool \fR=\fPstr
+Specifies the name of the Ceph pool containing RBD.
 .TP
-.B pareto
-Pareto distribution
+.BI (rbd)clientname \fR=\fPstr
+Specifies the username (without the 'client.' prefix) used to access the
+Ceph cluster. If the \fBclustername\fR is specified, the \fBclientname\fR shall be
+the full *type.id* string. If no type. prefix is given, fio will add 'client.'
+by default.
 .TP
-.B gauss
-Normal (gaussian) distribution
+.BI (mtd)skip_bad \fR=\fPbool
+Skip operations against known bad blocks.
 .TP
-.B zoned
-Zoned random distribution
+.BI (libhdfs)hdfsdirectory
+libhdfs will create chunk in this HDFS directory.
 .TP
-.RE
-When using a \fBzipf\fR or \fBpareto\fR distribution, an input value is also
-needed to define the access pattern. For \fBzipf\fR, this is the zipf theta.
-For \fBpareto\fR, it's the pareto power. Fio includes a test program, genzipf,
-that can be used visualize what the given input values will yield in terms of
-hit rates. If you wanted to use \fBzipf\fR with a theta of 1.2, you would use
-random_distribution=zipf:1.2 as the option. If a non-uniform model is used,
-fio will disable use of the random map. For the \fBgauss\fR distribution, a
-normal deviation is supplied as a value between 0 and 100.
-.P
-.RS
-For a \fBzoned\fR distribution, fio supports specifying percentages of IO
-access that should fall within what range of the file or device. For example,
-given a criteria of:
-.P
-.RS
-60% of accesses should be to the first 10%
-.RE
+.BI (libhdfs)chunk_size
+The size of the chunk to use for each file.
+.SS "I/O depth"
+.TP
+.BI iodepth \fR=\fPint
+Number of I/O units to keep in flight against the file. Note that
+increasing \fBiodepth\fR beyond 1 will not affect synchronous ioengines (except
+for small degrees when \fBverify_async\fR is in use). Even async
+engines may impose OS restrictions causing the desired depth not to be
+achieved. This may happen on Linux when using libaio and not setting
+`direct=1', since buffered I/O is not async on that OS. Keep an
+eye on the I/O depth distribution in the fio output to verify that the
+achieved depth is as expected. Default: 1.
+.TP
+.BI iodepth_batch_submit \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fP iodepth_batch" \fR=\fPint
+This defines how many pieces of I/O to submit at once. It defaults to 1
+which means that we submit each I/O as soon as it is available, but can be
+raised to submit bigger batches of I/O at the time. If it is set to 0 the
+\fBiodepth\fR value will be used.
+.TP
+.BI iodepth_batch_complete_min \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fP iodepth_batch_complete" \fR=\fPint
+This defines how many pieces of I/O to retrieve at once. It defaults to 1
+which means that we'll ask for a minimum of 1 I/O in the retrieval process
+from the kernel. The I/O retrieval will go on until we hit the limit set by
+\fBiodepth_low\fR. If this variable is set to 0, then fio will always
+check for completed events before queuing more I/O. This helps reduce I/O
+latency, at the cost of more retrieval system calls.
+.TP
+.BI iodepth_batch_complete_max \fR=\fPint
+This defines maximum pieces of I/O to retrieve at once. This variable should
+be used along with \fBiodepth_batch_complete_min\fR=\fIint\fR variable,
+specifying the range of min and max amount of I/O which should be
+retrieved. By default it is equal to \fBiodepth_batch_complete_min\fR
+value. Example #1:
 .RS
-30% of accesses should be to the next 20%
-.RE
 .RS
-8% of accesses should be to to the next 30%
+.P
+.PD 0
+iodepth_batch_complete_min=1
+.P
+iodepth_batch_complete_max=<iodepth>
+.PD
 .RE
+.P
+which means that we will retrieve at least 1 I/O and up to the whole
+submitted queue depth. If none of I/O has been completed yet, we will wait.
+Example #2:
 .RS
-2% of accesses should be to the next 40%
-.RE
 .P
-we can define that through zoning of the random accesses. For the above
-example, the user would do:
+.PD 0
+iodepth_batch_complete_min=0
 .P
-.RS
-.B random_distribution=zoned:60/10:30/20:8/30:2/40
+iodepth_batch_complete_max=<iodepth>
+.PD
 .RE
 .P
-similarly to how \fBbssplit\fR works for setting ranges and percentages of block
-sizes. Like \fBbssplit\fR, it's possible to specify separate zones for reads,
-writes, and trims. If just one set is given, it'll apply to all of them.
+which means that we can retrieve up to the whole submitted queue depth, but
+if none of I/O has been completed yet, we will NOT wait and immediately exit
+the system call. In this example we simply do polling.
 .RE
 .TP
-.BI percentage_random \fR=\fPint
-For a random workload, set how big a percentage should be random. This defaults
-to 100%, in which case the workload is fully random. It can be set from
-anywhere from 0 to 100.  Setting it to 0 would make the workload fully
-sequential. It is possible to set different values for reads, writes, and
-trim. To do so, simply use a comma separated list. See \fBblocksize\fR.
+.BI iodepth_low \fR=\fPint
+The low water mark indicating when to start filling the queue
+again. Defaults to the same as \fBiodepth\fR, meaning that fio will
+attempt to keep the queue full at all times. If \fBiodepth\fR is set to
+e.g. 16 and \fBiodepth_low\fR is set to 4, then after fio has filled the queue of
+16 requests, it will let the depth drain down to 4 before starting to fill
+it again.
+.TP
+.BI serialize_overlap \fR=\fPbool
+Serialize in-flight I/Os that might otherwise cause or suffer from data races.
+When two or more I/Os are submitted simultaneously, there is no guarantee that
+the I/Os will be processed or completed in the submitted order. Further, if
+two or more of those I/Os are writes, any overlapping region between them can
+become indeterminate/undefined on certain storage. These issues can cause
+verification to fail erratically when at least one of the racing I/Os is
+changing data and the overlapping region has a non-zero size. Setting
+\fBserialize_overlap\fR tells fio to avoid provoking this behavior by explicitly
+serializing in-flight I/Os that have a non-zero overlap. Note that setting
+this option can reduce both performance and the \fBiodepth\fR achieved.
+Additionally this option does not work when \fBio_submit_mode\fR is set to
+offload. Default: false.
 .TP
-.B norandommap
-Normally \fBfio\fR will cover every block of the file when doing random I/O. If
-this parameter is given, a new offset will be chosen without looking at past
-I/O history.  This parameter is mutually exclusive with \fBverify\fR.
+.BI io_submit_mode \fR=\fPstr
+This option controls how fio submits the I/O to the I/O engine. The default
+is `inline', which means that the fio job threads submit and reap I/O
+directly. If set to `offload', the job threads will offload I/O submission
+to a dedicated pool of I/O threads. This requires some coordination and thus
+has a bit of extra overhead, especially for lower queue depth I/O where it
+can increase latencies. The benefit is that fio can manage submission rates
+independently of the device completion rates. This avoids skewed latency
+reporting if I/O gets backed up on the device side (the coordinated omission
+problem).
+.SS "I/O rate"
 .TP
-.BI softrandommap \fR=\fPbool
-See \fBnorandommap\fR. If fio runs with the random block map enabled and it
-fails to allocate the map, if this option is set it will continue without a
-random block map. As coverage will not be as complete as with random maps, this
-option is disabled by default.
+.BI thinktime \fR=\fPtime
+Stall the job for the specified period of time after an I/O has completed before issuing the
+next. May be used to simulate processing being done by an application.
+When the unit is omitted, the value is interpreted in microseconds. See
+\fBthinktime_blocks\fR and \fBthinktime_spin\fR.
 .TP
-.BI random_generator \fR=\fPstr
-Fio supports the following engines for generating IO offsets for random IO:
+.BI thinktime_spin \fR=\fPtime
+Only valid if \fBthinktime\fR is set \- pretend to spend CPU time doing
+something with the data received, before falling back to sleeping for the
+rest of the period specified by \fBthinktime\fR. When the unit is
+omitted, the value is interpreted in microseconds.
+.TP
+.BI thinktime_blocks \fR=\fPint
+Only valid if \fBthinktime\fR is set \- control how many blocks to issue,
+before waiting \fBthinktime\fR usecs. If not set, defaults to 1 which will make
+fio wait \fBthinktime\fR usecs after every block. This effectively makes any
+queue depth setting redundant, since no more than 1 I/O will be queued
+before we have to complete it and do our \fBthinktime\fR. In other words, this
+setting effectively caps the queue depth if the latter is larger.
+.TP
+.BI rate \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+Cap the bandwidth used by this job. The number is in bytes/sec, the normal
+suffix rules apply. Comma\-separated values may be specified for reads,
+writes, and trims as described in \fBblocksize\fR.
 .RS
+.P
+For example, using `rate=1m,500k' would limit reads to 1MiB/sec and writes to
+500KiB/sec. Capping only reads or writes can be done with `rate=,500k' or
+`rate=500k,' where the former will only limit writes (to 500KiB/sec) and the
+latter will only limit reads.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI rate_min \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+Tell fio to do whatever it can to maintain at least this bandwidth. Failing
+to meet this requirement will cause the job to exit. Comma\-separated values
+may be specified for reads, writes, and trims as described in
+\fBblocksize\fR.
+.TP
+.BI rate_iops \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+Cap the bandwidth to this number of IOPS. Basically the same as
+\fBrate\fR, just specified independently of bandwidth. If the job is
+given a block size range instead of a fixed value, the smallest block size
+is used as the metric. Comma\-separated values may be specified for reads,
+writes, and trims as described in \fBblocksize\fR.
+.TP
+.BI rate_iops_min \fR=\fPint[,int][,int]
+If fio doesn't meet this rate of I/O, it will cause the job to exit.
+Comma\-separated values may be specified for reads, writes, and trims as
+described in \fBblocksize\fR.
 .TP
-.B tausworthe
-Strong 2^88 cycle random number generator
+.BI rate_process \fR=\fPstr
+This option controls how fio manages rated I/O submissions. The default is
+`linear', which submits I/O in a linear fashion with fixed delays between
+I/Os that gets adjusted based on I/O completion rates. If this is set to
+`poisson', fio will submit I/O based on a more real world random request
+flow, known as the Poisson process
+(\fIhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_point_process\fR). The lambda will be
+10^6 / IOPS for the given workload.
+.SS "I/O latency"
 .TP
-.B lfsr
-Linear feedback shift register generator
+.BI latency_target \fR=\fPtime
+If set, fio will attempt to find the max performance point that the given
+workload will run at while maintaining a latency below this target. When
+the unit is omitted, the value is interpreted in microseconds. See
+\fBlatency_window\fR and \fBlatency_percentile\fR.
 .TP
-.B tausworthe64
-Strong 64-bit 2^258 cycle random number generator
+.BI latency_window \fR=\fPtime
+Used with \fBlatency_target\fR to specify the sample window that the job
+is run at varying queue depths to test the performance. When the unit is
+omitted, the value is interpreted in microseconds.
 .TP
-.RE
-.P
-Tausworthe is a strong random number generator, but it requires tracking on the
-side if we want to ensure that blocks are only read or written once. LFSR
-guarantees that we never generate the same offset twice, and it's also less
-computationally expensive. It's not a true random generator, however, though
-for IO purposes it's typically good enough. LFSR only works with single block
-sizes, not with workloads that use multiple block sizes. If used with such a
-workload, fio may read or write some blocks multiple times. The default
-value is tausworthe, unless the required space exceeds 2^32 blocks. If it does,
-then tausworthe64 is selected automatically.
+.BI latency_percentile \fR=\fPfloat
+The percentage of I/Os that must fall within the criteria specified by
+\fBlatency_target\fR and \fBlatency_window\fR. If not set, this
+defaults to 100.0, meaning that all I/Os must be equal or below to the value
+set by \fBlatency_target\fR.
 .TP
-.BI nice \fR=\fPint
-Run job with given nice value.  See \fBnice\fR\|(2).
+.BI max_latency \fR=\fPtime
+If set, fio will exit the job with an ETIMEDOUT error if it exceeds this
+maximum latency. When the unit is omitted, the value is interpreted in
+microseconds.
 .TP
-.BI prio \fR=\fPint
-Set I/O priority value of this job between 0 (highest) and 7 (lowest).  See
-\fBionice\fR\|(1).
+.BI rate_cycle \fR=\fPint
+Average bandwidth for \fBrate\fR and \fBrate_min\fR over this number
+of milliseconds. Defaults to 1000.
+.SS "I/O replay"
 .TP
-.BI prioclass \fR=\fPint
-Set I/O priority class.  See \fBionice\fR\|(1).
+.BI write_iolog \fR=\fPstr
+Write the issued I/O patterns to the specified file. See
+\fBread_iolog\fR. Specify a separate file for each job, otherwise the
+iologs will be interspersed and the file may be corrupt.
 .TP
-.BI thinktime \fR=\fPint
-Stall job for given number of microseconds between issuing I/Os.
+.BI read_iolog \fR=\fPstr
+Open an iolog with the specified filename and replay the I/O patterns it
+contains. This can be used to store a workload and replay it sometime
+later. The iolog given may also be a blktrace binary file, which allows fio
+to replay a workload captured by blktrace. See
+\fBblktrace\fR\|(8) for how to capture such logging data. For blktrace
+replay, the file needs to be turned into a blkparse binary data file first
+(`blkparse <device> \-o /dev/null \-d file_for_fio.bin').
+.TP
+.BI replay_no_stall \fR=\fPbool
+When replaying I/O with \fBread_iolog\fR the default behavior is to
+attempt to respect the timestamps within the log and replay them with the
+appropriate delay between IOPS. By setting this variable fio will not
+respect the timestamps and attempt to replay them as fast as possible while
+still respecting ordering. The result is the same I/O pattern to a given
+device, but different timings.
 .TP
-.BI thinktime_spin \fR=\fPint
-Pretend to spend CPU time for given number of microseconds, sleeping the rest
-of the time specified by \fBthinktime\fR.  Only valid if \fBthinktime\fR is set.
+.BI replay_redirect \fR=\fPstr
+While replaying I/O patterns using \fBread_iolog\fR the default behavior
+is to replay the IOPS onto the major/minor device that each IOP was recorded
+from. This is sometimes undesirable because on a different machine those
+major/minor numbers can map to a different device. Changing hardware on the
+same system can also result in a different major/minor mapping.
+\fBreplay_redirect\fR causes all I/Os to be replayed onto the single specified
+device regardless of the device it was recorded
+from. i.e. `replay_redirect=/dev/sdc' would cause all I/O
+in the blktrace or iolog to be replayed onto `/dev/sdc'. This means
+multiple devices will be replayed onto a single device, if the trace
+contains multiple devices. If you want multiple devices to be replayed
+concurrently to multiple redirected devices you must blkparse your trace
+into separate traces and replay them with independent fio invocations.
+Unfortunately this also breaks the strict time ordering between multiple
+device accesses.
 .TP
-.BI thinktime_blocks \fR=\fPint
-Only valid if thinktime is set - control how many blocks to issue, before
-waiting \fBthinktime\fR microseconds. If not set, defaults to 1 which will
-make fio wait \fBthinktime\fR microseconds after every block. This
-effectively makes any queue depth setting redundant, since no more than 1 IO
-will be queued before we have to complete it and do our thinktime. In other
-words, this setting effectively caps the queue depth if the latter is larger.
-Default: 1.
-.TP
-.BI rate \fR=\fPint
-Cap bandwidth used by this job. The number is in bytes/sec, the normal postfix
-rules apply. You can use \fBrate\fR=500k to limit reads and writes to 500k each,
-or you can specify read and writes separately. Using \fBrate\fR=1m,500k would
-limit reads to 1MB/sec and writes to 500KB/sec. Capping only reads or writes
-can be done with \fBrate\fR=,500k or \fBrate\fR=500k,. The former will only
-limit writes (to 500KB/sec), the latter will only limit reads.
-.TP
-.BI rate_min \fR=\fPint
-Tell \fBfio\fR to do whatever it can to maintain at least the given bandwidth.
-Failing to meet this requirement will cause the job to exit. The same format
-as \fBrate\fR is used for read vs write separation.
-.TP
-.BI rate_iops \fR=\fPint
-Cap the bandwidth to this number of IOPS. Basically the same as rate, just
-specified independently of bandwidth. The same format as \fBrate\fR is used for
-read vs write separation. If \fBblocksize\fR is a range, the smallest block
-size is used as the metric.
-.TP
-.BI rate_iops_min \fR=\fPint
-If this rate of I/O is not met, the job will exit. The same format as \fBrate\fR
-is used for read vs write separation.
+.BI replay_align \fR=\fPint
+Force alignment of I/O offsets and lengths in a trace to this power of 2
+value.
 .TP
-.BI rate_process \fR=\fPstr
-This option controls how fio manages rated IO submissions. The default is
-\fBlinear\fR, which submits IO in a linear fashion with fixed delays between
-IOs that gets adjusted based on IO completion rates. If this is set to
-\fBpoisson\fR, fio will submit IO based on a more real world random request
-flow, known as the Poisson process
-(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_process). The lambda will be
-10^6 / IOPS for the given workload.
+.BI replay_scale \fR=\fPint
+Scale sector offsets down by this factor when replaying traces.
+.SS "Threads, processes and job synchronization"
 .TP
-.BI rate_cycle \fR=\fPint
-Average bandwidth for \fBrate\fR and \fBrate_min\fR over this number of
-milliseconds.  Default: 1000ms.
+.BI thread
+Fio defaults to creating jobs by using fork, however if this option is
+given, fio will create jobs by using POSIX Threads' function
+\fBpthread_create\fR\|(3) to create threads instead.
 .TP
-.BI latency_target \fR=\fPint
-If set, fio will attempt to find the max performance point that the given
-workload will run at while maintaining a latency below this target. The
-values is given in microseconds. See \fBlatency_window\fR and
-\fBlatency_percentile\fR.
+.BI wait_for \fR=\fPstr
+If set, the current job won't be started until all workers of the specified
+waitee job are done.
+.\" ignore blank line here from HOWTO as it looks normal without it
+\fBwait_for\fR operates on the job name basis, so there are a few
+limitations. First, the waitee must be defined prior to the waiter job
+(meaning no forward references). Second, if a job is being referenced as a
+waitee, it must have a unique name (no duplicate waitees).
 .TP
-.BI latency_window \fR=\fPint
-Used with \fBlatency_target\fR to specify the sample window that the job
-is run at varying queue depths to test the performance. The value is given
-in microseconds.
+.BI nice \fR=\fPint
+Run the job with the given nice value. See man \fBnice\fR\|(2).
+.\" ignore blank line here from HOWTO as it looks normal without it
+On Windows, values less than \-15 set the process class to "High"; \-1 through
+\-15 set "Above Normal"; 1 through 15 "Below Normal"; and above 15 "Idle"
+priority class.
 .TP
-.BI latency_percentile \fR=\fPfloat
-The percentage of IOs that must fall within the criteria specified by
-\fBlatency_target\fR and \fBlatency_window\fR. If not set, this defaults
-to 100.0, meaning that all IOs must be equal or below to the value set
-by \fBlatency_target\fR.
+.BI prio \fR=\fPint
+Set the I/O priority value of this job. Linux limits us to a positive value
+between 0 and 7, with 0 being the highest. See man
+\fBionice\fR\|(1). Refer to an appropriate manpage for other operating
+systems since meaning of priority may differ.
 .TP
-.BI max_latency \fR=\fPint
-If set, fio will exit the job if it exceeds this maximum latency. It will exit
-with an ETIME error.
+.BI prioclass \fR=\fPint
+Set the I/O priority class. See man \fBionice\fR\|(1).
 .TP
 .BI cpumask \fR=\fPint
-Set CPU affinity for this job. \fIint\fR is a bitmask of allowed CPUs the job
-may run on.  See \fBsched_setaffinity\fR\|(2).
+Set the CPU affinity of this job. The parameter given is a bit mask of
+allowed CPUs the job may run on. So if you want the allowed CPUs to be 1
+and 5, you would pass the decimal value of (1 << 1 | 1 << 5), or 34. See man
+\fBsched_setaffinity\fR\|(2). This may not work on all supported
+operating systems or kernel versions. This option doesn't work well for a
+higher CPU count than what you can store in an integer mask, so it can only
+control cpus 1\-32. For boxes with larger CPU counts, use
+\fBcpus_allowed\fR.
 .TP
 .BI cpus_allowed \fR=\fPstr
-Same as \fBcpumask\fR, but allows a comma-delimited list of CPU numbers.
+Controls the same options as \fBcpumask\fR, but accepts a textual
+specification of the permitted CPUs instead. So to use CPUs 1 and 5 you
+would specify `cpus_allowed=1,5'. This option also allows a range of CPUs
+to be specified \-\- say you wanted a binding to CPUs 1, 5, and 8 to 15, you
+would set `cpus_allowed=1,5,8\-15'.
 .TP
 .BI cpus_allowed_policy \fR=\fPstr
-Set the policy of how fio distributes the CPUs specified by \fBcpus_allowed\fR
-or \fBcpumask\fR. Two policies are supported:
+Set the policy of how fio distributes the CPUs specified by
+\fBcpus_allowed\fR or \fBcpumask\fR. Two policies are supported:
 .RS
 .RS
 .TP
@@ -1069,753 +2010,711 @@ All jobs will share the CPU set specified.
 Each job will get a unique CPU from the CPU set.
 .RE
 .P
-\fBshared\fR is the default behaviour, if the option isn't specified. If
-\fBsplit\fR is specified, then fio will assign one cpu per job. If not enough
-CPUs are given for the jobs listed, then fio will roundrobin the CPUs in
-the set.
+\fBshared\fR is the default behavior, if the option isn't specified. If
+\fBsplit\fR is specified, then fio will will assign one cpu per job. If not
+enough CPUs are given for the jobs listed, then fio will roundrobin the CPUs
+in the set.
 .RE
-.P
 .TP
 .BI numa_cpu_nodes \fR=\fPstr
 Set this job running on specified NUMA nodes' CPUs. The arguments allow
-comma delimited list of cpu numbers, A-B ranges, or 'all'.
+comma delimited list of cpu numbers, A\-B ranges, or `all'. Note, to enable
+NUMA options support, fio must be built on a system with libnuma\-dev(el)
+installed.
 .TP
 .BI numa_mem_policy \fR=\fPstr
-Set this job's memory policy and corresponding NUMA nodes. Format of
-the arguments:
+Set this job's memory policy and corresponding NUMA nodes. Format of the
+arguments:
 .RS
-.TP
-.B <mode>[:<nodelist>]
-.TP
-.B mode
-is one of the following memory policy:
-.TP
-.B default, prefer, bind, interleave, local
-.TP
+.RS
+.P
+<mode>[:<nodelist>]
+.RE
+.P
+`mode' is one of the following memory poicies: `default', `prefer',
+`bind', `interleave' or `local'. For `default' and `local' memory
+policies, no node needs to be specified. For `prefer', only one node is
+allowed. For `bind' and `interleave' the `nodelist' may be as
+follows: a comma delimited list of numbers, A\-B ranges, or `all'.
 .RE
-For \fBdefault\fR and \fBlocal\fR memory policy, no \fBnodelist\fR is
-needed to be specified. For \fBprefer\fR, only one node is
-allowed. For \fBbind\fR and \fBinterleave\fR, \fBnodelist\fR allows
-comma delimited list of numbers, A-B ranges, or 'all'.
-.TP
-.BI startdelay \fR=\fPirange
-Delay start of job for the specified number of seconds. Supports all time
-suffixes to allow specification of hours, minutes, seconds and
-milliseconds - seconds are the default if a unit is omitted.
-Can be given as a range which causes each thread to choose randomly out of the
-range.
-.TP
-.BI runtime \fR=\fPint
-Terminate processing after the specified number of seconds.
 .TP
-.B time_based
-If given, run for the specified \fBruntime\fR duration even if the files are
-completely read or written. The same workload will be repeated as many times
-as \fBruntime\fR allows.
+.BI cgroup \fR=\fPstr
+Add job to this control group. If it doesn't exist, it will be created. The
+system must have a mounted cgroup blkio mount point for this to work. If
+your system doesn't have it mounted, you can do so with:
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+# mount \-t cgroup \-o blkio none /cgroup
+.RE
+.RE
 .TP
-.BI ramp_time \fR=\fPint
-If set, fio will run the specified workload for this amount of time before
-logging any performance numbers. Useful for letting performance settle before
-logging results, thus minimizing the runtime required for stable results. Note
-that the \fBramp_time\fR is considered lead in time for a job, thus it will
-increase the total runtime if a special timeout or runtime is specified.
+.BI cgroup_weight \fR=\fPint
+Set the weight of the cgroup to this value. See the documentation that comes
+with the kernel, allowed values are in the range of 100..1000.
 .TP
-.BI invalidate \fR=\fPbool
-Invalidate buffer-cache for the file prior to starting I/O.  Default: true.
+.BI cgroup_nodelete \fR=\fPbool
+Normally fio will delete the cgroups it has created after the job
+completion. To override this behavior and to leave cgroups around after the
+job completion, set `cgroup_nodelete=1'. This can be useful if one wants
+to inspect various cgroup files after job completion. Default: false.
 .TP
-.BI sync \fR=\fPbool
-Use synchronous I/O for buffered writes.  For the majority of I/O engines,
-this means using O_SYNC.  Default: false.
+.BI flow_id \fR=\fPint
+The ID of the flow. If not specified, it defaults to being a global
+flow. See \fBflow\fR.
 .TP
-.BI iomem \fR=\fPstr "\fR,\fP mem" \fR=\fPstr
-Allocation method for I/O unit buffer.  Allowed values are:
-.RS
-.RS
+.BI flow \fR=\fPint
+Weight in token\-based flow control. If this value is used, then there is
+a 'flow counter' which is used to regulate the proportion of activity between
+two or more jobs. Fio attempts to keep this flow counter near zero. The
+\fBflow\fR parameter stands for how much should be added or subtracted to the
+flow counter on each iteration of the main I/O loop. That is, if one job has
+`flow=8' and another job has `flow=\-1', then there will be a roughly 1:8
+ratio in how much one runs vs the other.
 .TP
-.B malloc
-Allocate memory with \fBmalloc\fR\|(3).
+.BI flow_watermark \fR=\fPint
+The maximum value that the absolute value of the flow counter is allowed to
+reach before the job must wait for a lower value of the counter.
 .TP
-.B shm
-Use shared memory buffers allocated through \fBshmget\fR\|(2).
+.BI flow_sleep \fR=\fPint
+The period of time, in microseconds, to wait after the flow watermark has
+been exceeded before retrying operations.
 .TP
-.B shmhuge
-Same as \fBshm\fR, but use huge pages as backing.
+.BI stonewall "\fR,\fB wait_for_previous"
+Wait for preceding jobs in the job file to exit, before starting this
+one. Can be used to insert serialization points in the job file. A stone
+wall also implies starting a new reporting group, see
+\fBgroup_reporting\fR.
 .TP
-.B mmap
-Use \fBmmap\fR\|(2) for allocation.  Uses anonymous memory unless a filename
-is given after the option in the format `:\fIfile\fR'.
+.BI exitall
+By default, fio will continue running all other jobs when one job finishes
+but sometimes this is not the desired action. Setting \fBexitall\fR will
+instead make fio terminate all other jobs when one job finishes.
 .TP
-.B mmaphuge
-Same as \fBmmap\fR, but use huge files as backing.
+.BI exec_prerun \fR=\fPstr
+Before running this job, issue the command specified through
+\fBsystem\fR\|(3). Output is redirected in a file called `jobname.prerun.txt'.
 .TP
-.B mmapshared
-Same as \fBmmap\fR, but use a MMAP_SHARED mapping.
-.RE
-.P
-The amount of memory allocated is the maximum allowed \fBblocksize\fR for the
-job multiplied by \fBiodepth\fR.  For \fBshmhuge\fR or \fBmmaphuge\fR to work,
-the system must have free huge pages allocated.  \fBmmaphuge\fR also needs to
-have hugetlbfs mounted, and \fIfile\fR must point there. At least on Linux,
-huge pages must be manually allocated. See \fB/proc/sys/vm/nr_hugehages\fR
-and the documentation for that. Normally you just need to echo an appropriate
-number, eg echoing 8 will ensure that the OS has 8 huge pages ready for
-use.
-.RE
+.BI exec_postrun \fR=\fPstr
+After the job completes, issue the command specified though
+\fBsystem\fR\|(3). Output is redirected in a file called `jobname.postrun.txt'.
 .TP
-.BI iomem_align \fR=\fPint "\fR,\fP mem_align" \fR=\fPint
-This indicates the memory alignment of the IO memory buffers. Note that the
-given alignment is applied to the first IO unit buffer, if using \fBiodepth\fR
-the alignment of the following buffers are given by the \fBbs\fR used. In
-other words, if using a \fBbs\fR that is a multiple of the page sized in the
-system, all buffers will be aligned to this value. If using a \fBbs\fR that
-is not page aligned, the alignment of subsequent IO memory buffers is the
-sum of the \fBiomem_align\fR and \fBbs\fR used.
+.BI uid \fR=\fPint
+Instead of running as the invoking user, set the user ID to this value
+before the thread/process does any work.
 .TP
-.BI hugepage\-size \fR=\fPint
-Defines the size of a huge page.  Must be at least equal to the system setting.
-Should be a multiple of 1MB. Default: 4MB.
+.BI gid \fR=\fPint
+Set group ID, see \fBuid\fR.
+.SS "Verification"
 .TP
-.B exitall
-Terminate all jobs when one finishes.  Default: wait for each job to finish.
+.BI verify_only
+Do not perform specified workload, only verify data still matches previous
+invocation of this workload. This option allows one to check data multiple
+times at a later date without overwriting it. This option makes sense only
+for workloads that write data, and does not support workloads with the
+\fBtime_based\fR option set.
 .TP
-.B exitall_on_error \fR=\fPbool
-Terminate all jobs if one job finishes in error.  Default: wait for each job
-to finish.
+.BI do_verify \fR=\fPbool
+Run the verify phase after a write phase. Only valid if \fBverify\fR is
+set. Default: true.
 .TP
-.BI bwavgtime \fR=\fPint
-Average bandwidth calculations over the given time in milliseconds. If the job
-also does bandwidth logging through \fBwrite_bw_log\fR, then the minimum of
-this option and \fBlog_avg_msec\fR will be used.  Default: 500ms.
+.BI verify \fR=\fPstr
+If writing to a file, fio can verify the file contents after each iteration
+of the job. Each verification method also implies verification of special
+header, which is written to the beginning of each block. This header also
+includes meta information, like offset of the block, block number, timestamp
+when block was written, etc. \fBverify\fR can be combined with
+\fBverify_pattern\fR option. The allowed values are:
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.BI iopsavgtime \fR=\fPint
-Average IOPS calculations over the given time in milliseconds. If the job
-also does IOPS logging through \fBwrite_iops_log\fR, then the minimum of
-this option and \fBlog_avg_msec\fR will be used.  Default: 500ms.
+.B md5
+Use an md5 sum of the data area and store it in the header of
+each block.
 .TP
-.BI create_serialize \fR=\fPbool
-If true, serialize file creation for the jobs.  Default: true.
+.B crc64
+Use an experimental crc64 sum of the data area and store it in the
+header of each block.
 .TP
-.BI create_fsync \fR=\fPbool
-\fBfsync\fR\|(2) data file after creation.  Default: true.
+.B crc32c
+Use a crc32c sum of the data area and store it in the header of
+each block. This will automatically use hardware acceleration
+(e.g. SSE4.2 on an x86 or CRC crypto extensions on ARM64) but will
+fall back to software crc32c if none is found. Generally the
+fatest checksum fio supports when hardware accelerated.
 .TP
-.BI create_on_open \fR=\fPbool
-If true, the files are not created until they are opened for IO by the job.
+.B crc32c\-intel
+Synonym for crc32c.
 .TP
-.BI create_only \fR=\fPbool
-If true, fio will only run the setup phase of the job. If files need to be
-laid out or updated on disk, only that will be done. The actual job contents
-are not executed.
+.B crc32
+Use a crc32 sum of the data area and store it in the header of each
+block.
 .TP
-.BI allow_file_create \fR=\fPbool
-If true, fio is permitted to create files as part of its workload. This is
-the default behavior. If this option is false, then fio will error out if the
-files it needs to use don't already exist. Default: true.
+.B crc16
+Use a crc16 sum of the data area and store it in the header of each
+block.
 .TP
-.BI allow_mounted_write \fR=\fPbool
-If this isn't set, fio will abort jobs that are destructive (eg that write)
-to what appears to be a mounted device or partition. This should help catch
-creating inadvertently destructive tests, not realizing that the test will
-destroy data on the mounted file system. Default: false.
+.B crc7
+Use a crc7 sum of the data area and store it in the header of each
+block.
 .TP
-.BI pre_read \fR=\fPbool
-If this is given, files will be pre-read into memory before starting the given
-IO operation. This will also clear the \fR \fBinvalidate\fR flag, since it is
-pointless to pre-read and then drop the cache. This will only work for IO
-engines that are seekable, since they allow you to read the same data
-multiple times. Thus it will not work on eg network or splice IO.
+.B xxhash
+Use xxhash as the checksum function. Generally the fastest software
+checksum that fio supports.
 .TP
-.BI unlink \fR=\fPbool
-Unlink job files when done.  Default: false.
+.B sha512
+Use sha512 as the checksum function.
 .TP
-.BI loops \fR=\fPint
-Specifies the number of iterations (runs of the same workload) of this job.
-Default: 1.
+.B sha256
+Use sha256 as the checksum function.
 .TP
-.BI verify_only \fR=\fPbool
-Do not perform the specified workload, only verify data still matches previous
-invocation of this workload. This option allows one to check data multiple
-times at a later date without overwriting it. This option makes sense only for
-workloads that write data, and does not support workloads with the
-\fBtime_based\fR option set.
+.B sha1
+Use optimized sha1 as the checksum function.
 .TP
-.BI do_verify \fR=\fPbool
-Run the verify phase after a write phase.  Only valid if \fBverify\fR is set.
-Default: true.
+.B sha3\-224
+Use optimized sha3\-224 as the checksum function.
 .TP
-.BI verify \fR=\fPstr
-Method of verifying file contents after each iteration of the job. Each
-verification method also implies verification of special header, which is
-written to the beginning of each block. This header also includes meta
-information, like offset of the block, block number, timestamp when block
-was written, etc.  \fBverify\fR=str can be combined with \fBverify_pattern\fR=str
-option.  The allowed values are:
-.RS
-.RS
+.B sha3\-256
+Use optimized sha3\-256 as the checksum function.
+.TP
+.B sha3\-384
+Use optimized sha3\-384 as the checksum function.
 .TP
-.B md5 crc16 crc32 crc32c crc32c-intel crc64 crc7 sha256 sha512 sha1 xxhash
-Store appropriate checksum in the header of each block. crc32c-intel is
-hardware accelerated SSE4.2 driven, falls back to regular crc32c if
-not supported by the system.
+.B sha3\-512
+Use optimized sha3\-512 as the checksum function.
 .TP
 .B meta
-This option is deprecated, since now meta information is included in generic
-verification header and meta verification happens by default.  For detailed
-information see the description of the \fBverify\fR=str setting. This option
-is kept because of compatibility's sake with old configurations. Do not use it.
+This option is deprecated, since now meta information is included in
+generic verification header and meta verification happens by
+default. For detailed information see the description of the
+\fBverify\fR setting. This option is kept because of
+compatibility's sake with old configurations. Do not use it.
 .TP
 .B pattern
-Verify a strict pattern. Normally fio includes a header with some basic
-information and checksumming, but if this option is set, only the
-specific pattern set with \fBverify_pattern\fR is verified.
+Verify a strict pattern. Normally fio includes a header with some
+basic information and checksumming, but if this option is set, only
+the specific pattern set with \fBverify_pattern\fR is verified.
 .TP
 .B null
-Pretend to verify.  Used for testing internals.
+Only pretend to verify. Useful for testing internals with
+`ioengine=null', not for much else.
 .RE
-
-This option can be used for repeated burn-in tests of a system to make sure
-that the written data is also correctly read back. If the data direction given
-is a read or random read, fio will assume that it should verify a previously
-written file. If the data direction includes any form of write, the verify will
-be of the newly written data.
+.P
+This option can be used for repeated burn\-in tests of a system to make sure
+that the written data is also correctly read back. If the data direction
+given is a read or random read, fio will assume that it should verify a
+previously written file. If the data direction includes any form of write,
+the verify will be of the newly written data.
 .RE
 .TP
 .BI verifysort \fR=\fPbool
-If true, written verify blocks are sorted if \fBfio\fR deems it to be faster to
-read them back in a sorted manner.  Default: true.
+If true, fio will sort written verify blocks when it deems it faster to read
+them back in a sorted manner. This is often the case when overwriting an
+existing file, since the blocks are already laid out in the file system. You
+can ignore this option unless doing huge amounts of really fast I/O where
+the red\-black tree sorting CPU time becomes significant. Default: true.
 .TP
 .BI verifysort_nr \fR=\fPint
-Pre-load and sort verify blocks for a read workload.
+Pre\-load and sort verify blocks for a read workload.
 .TP
 .BI verify_offset \fR=\fPint
 Swap the verification header with data somewhere else in the block before
-writing.  It is swapped back before verifying.
+writing. It is swapped back before verifying.
 .TP
 .BI verify_interval \fR=\fPint
-Write the verification header for this number of bytes, which should divide
-\fBblocksize\fR.  Default: \fBblocksize\fR.
+Write the verification header at a finer granularity than the
+\fBblocksize\fR. It will be written for chunks the size of
+\fBverify_interval\fR. \fBblocksize\fR should divide this evenly.
 .TP
 .BI verify_pattern \fR=\fPstr
-If set, fio will fill the io buffers with this pattern. Fio defaults to filling
-with totally random bytes, but sometimes it's interesting to fill with a known
-pattern for io verification purposes. Depending on the width of the pattern,
-fio will fill 1/2/3/4 bytes of the buffer at the time(it can be either a
-decimal or a hex number). The verify_pattern if larger than a 32-bit quantity
-has to be a hex number that starts with either "0x" or "0X". Use with
-\fBverify\fP=str. Also, verify_pattern supports %o format, which means that for
-each block offset will be written and then verifyied back, e.g.:
+If set, fio will fill the I/O buffers with this pattern. Fio defaults to
+filling with totally random bytes, but sometimes it's interesting to fill
+with a known pattern for I/O verification purposes. Depending on the width
+of the pattern, fio will fill 1/2/3/4 bytes of the buffer at the time (it can
+be either a decimal or a hex number). The \fBverify_pattern\fR if larger than
+a 32\-bit quantity has to be a hex number that starts with either "0x" or
+"0X". Use with \fBverify\fR. Also, \fBverify_pattern\fR supports %o
+format, which means that for each block offset will be written and then
+verified back, e.g.:
 .RS
 .RS
-\fBverify_pattern\fR=%o
+.P
+verify_pattern=%o
 .RE
+.P
 Or use combination of everything:
-.LP
 .RS
-\fBverify_pattern\fR=0xff%o"abcd"-21
+.P
+verify_pattern=0xff%o"abcd"\-12
 .RE
 .RE
 .TP
 .BI verify_fatal \fR=\fPbool
-If true, exit the job on the first observed verification failure.  Default:
-false.
+Normally fio will keep checking the entire contents before quitting on a
+block verification failure. If this option is set, fio will exit the job on
+the first observed failure. Default: false.
 .TP
 .BI verify_dump \fR=\fPbool
-If set, dump the contents of both the original data block and the data block we
-read off disk to files. This allows later analysis to inspect just what kind of
-data corruption occurred. Off by default.
+If set, dump the contents of both the original data block and the data block
+we read off disk to files. This allows later analysis to inspect just what
+kind of data corruption occurred. Off by default.
 .TP
 .BI verify_async \fR=\fPint
-Fio will normally verify IO inline from the submitting thread. This option
-takes an integer describing how many async offload threads to create for IO
-verification instead, causing fio to offload the duty of verifying IO contents
-to one or more separate threads.  If using this offload option, even sync IO
-engines can benefit from using an \fBiodepth\fR setting higher than 1, as it
-allows them to have IO in flight while verifies are running.
+Fio will normally verify I/O inline from the submitting thread. This option
+takes an integer describing how many async offload threads to create for I/O
+verification instead, causing fio to offload the duty of verifying I/O
+contents to one or more separate threads. If using this offload option, even
+sync I/O engines can benefit from using an \fBiodepth\fR setting higher
+than 1, as it allows them to have I/O in flight while verifies are running.
+Defaults to 0 async threads, i.e. verification is not asynchronous.
 .TP
 .BI verify_async_cpus \fR=\fPstr
-Tell fio to set the given CPU affinity on the async IO verification threads.
-See \fBcpus_allowed\fP for the format used.
+Tell fio to set the given CPU affinity on the async I/O verification
+threads. See \fBcpus_allowed\fR for the format used.
 .TP
 .BI verify_backlog \fR=\fPint
 Fio will normally verify the written contents of a job that utilizes verify
 once that job has completed. In other words, everything is written then
 everything is read back and verified. You may want to verify continually
-instead for a variety of reasons. Fio stores the meta data associated with an
-IO block in memory, so for large verify workloads, quite a bit of memory would
-be used up holding this meta data. If this option is enabled, fio will write
-only N blocks before verifying these blocks.
+instead for a variety of reasons. Fio stores the meta data associated with
+an I/O block in memory, so for large verify workloads, quite a bit of memory
+would be used up holding this meta data. If this option is enabled, fio will
+write only N blocks before verifying these blocks.
 .TP
 .BI verify_backlog_batch \fR=\fPint
-Control how many blocks fio will verify if verify_backlog is set. If not set,
-will default to the value of \fBverify_backlog\fR (meaning the entire queue is
-read back and verified).  If \fBverify_backlog_batch\fR is less than
-\fBverify_backlog\fR then not all blocks will be verified,  if
-\fBverify_backlog_batch\fR is larger than \fBverify_backlog\fR,  some blocks
-will be verified more than once.
+Control how many blocks fio will verify if \fBverify_backlog\fR is
+set. If not set, will default to the value of \fBverify_backlog\fR
+(meaning the entire queue is read back and verified). If
+\fBverify_backlog_batch\fR is less than \fBverify_backlog\fR then not all
+blocks will be verified, if \fBverify_backlog_batch\fR is larger than
+\fBverify_backlog\fR, some blocks will be verified more than once.
+.TP
+.BI verify_state_save \fR=\fPbool
+When a job exits during the write phase of a verify workload, save its
+current state. This allows fio to replay up until that point, if the verify
+state is loaded for the verify read phase. The format of the filename is,
+roughly:
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+<type>\-<jobname>\-<jobindex>\-verify.state.
+.RE
+.P
+<type> is "local" for a local run, "sock" for a client/server socket
+connection, and "ip" (192.168.0.1, for instance) for a networked
+client/server connection. Defaults to true.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI verify_state_load \fR=\fPbool
+If a verify termination trigger was used, fio stores the current write state
+of each thread. This can be used at verification time so that fio knows how
+far it should verify. Without this information, fio will run a full
+verification pass, according to the settings in the job file used. Default
+false.
 .TP
 .BI trim_percentage \fR=\fPint
 Number of verify blocks to discard/trim.
 .TP
 .BI trim_verify_zero \fR=\fPbool
-Verify that trim/discarded blocks are returned as zeroes.
+Verify that trim/discarded blocks are returned as zeros.
 .TP
 .BI trim_backlog \fR=\fPint
-Trim after this number of blocks are written.
+Verify that trim/discarded blocks are returned as zeros.
 .TP
 .BI trim_backlog_batch \fR=\fPint
-Trim this number of IO blocks.
+Trim this number of I/O blocks.
 .TP
 .BI experimental_verify \fR=\fPbool
 Enable experimental verification.
+.SS "Steady state"
 .TP
-.BI verify_state_save \fR=\fPbool
-When a job exits during the write phase of a verify workload, save its
-current state. This allows fio to replay up until that point, if the
-verify state is loaded for the verify read phase.
-.TP
-.BI verify_state_load \fR=\fPbool
-If a verify termination trigger was used, fio stores the current write
-state of each thread. This can be used at verification time so that fio
-knows how far it should verify. Without this information, fio will run
-a full verification pass, according to the settings in the job file used.
-.TP
-.B stonewall "\fR,\fP wait_for_previous"
-Wait for preceding jobs in the job file to exit before starting this one.
-\fBstonewall\fR implies \fBnew_group\fR.
-.TP
-.B new_group
-Start a new reporting group.  If not given, all jobs in a file will be part
-of the same reporting group, unless separated by a stonewall.
-.TP
-.BI numjobs \fR=\fPint
-Number of clones (processes/threads performing the same workload) of this job.
-Default: 1.
-.TP
-.B group_reporting
-If set, display per-group reports instead of per-job when \fBnumjobs\fR is
-specified.
-.TP
-.B thread
-Use threads created with \fBpthread_create\fR\|(3) instead of processes created
-with \fBfork\fR\|(2).
-.TP
-.BI zonesize \fR=\fPint
-Divide file into zones of the specified size in bytes.  See \fBzoneskip\fR.
-.TP
-.BI zonerange \fR=\fPint
-Give size of an IO zone.  See \fBzoneskip\fR.
-.TP
-.BI zoneskip \fR=\fPint
-Skip the specified number of bytes when \fBzonesize\fR bytes of data have been
-read.
+.BI steadystate \fR=\fPstr:float "\fR,\fP ss" \fR=\fPstr:float
+Define the criterion and limit for assessing steady state performance. The
+first parameter designates the criterion whereas the second parameter sets
+the threshold. When the criterion falls below the threshold for the
+specified duration, the job will stop. For example, `iops_slope:0.1%' will
+direct fio to terminate the job when the least squares regression slope
+falls below 0.1% of the mean IOPS. If \fBgroup_reporting\fR is enabled
+this will apply to all jobs in the group. Below is the list of available
+steady state assessment criteria. All assessments are carried out using only
+data from the rolling collection window. Threshold limits can be expressed
+as a fixed value or as a percentage of the mean in the collection window.
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.BI write_iolog \fR=\fPstr
-Write the issued I/O patterns to the specified file.  Specify a separate file
-for each job, otherwise the iologs will be interspersed and the file may be
-corrupt.
+.B iops
+Collect IOPS data. Stop the job if all individual IOPS measurements
+are within the specified limit of the mean IOPS (e.g., `iops:2'
+means that all individual IOPS values must be within 2 of the mean,
+whereas `iops:0.2%' means that all individual IOPS values must be
+within 0.2% of the mean IOPS to terminate the job).
 .TP
-.BI read_iolog \fR=\fPstr
-Replay the I/O patterns contained in the specified file generated by
-\fBwrite_iolog\fR, or may be a \fBblktrace\fR binary file.
+.B iops_slope
+Collect IOPS data and calculate the least squares regression
+slope. Stop the job if the slope falls below the specified limit.
 .TP
-.BI replay_no_stall \fR=\fPint
-While replaying I/O patterns using \fBread_iolog\fR the default behavior
-attempts to respect timing information between I/Os.  Enabling
-\fBreplay_no_stall\fR causes I/Os to be replayed as fast as possible while
-still respecting ordering.
+.B bw
+Collect bandwidth data. Stop the job if all individual bandwidth
+measurements are within the specified limit of the mean bandwidth.
 .TP
-.BI replay_redirect \fR=\fPstr
-While replaying I/O patterns using \fBread_iolog\fR the default behavior
-is to replay the IOPS onto the major/minor device that each IOP was recorded
-from.  Setting \fBreplay_redirect\fR causes all IOPS to be replayed onto the
-single specified device regardless of the device it was recorded from.
+.B bw_slope
+Collect bandwidth data and calculate the least squares regression
+slope. Stop the job if the slope falls below the specified limit.
+.RE
+.RE
 .TP
-.BI replay_align \fR=\fPint
-Force alignment of IO offsets and lengths in a trace to this power of 2 value.
+.BI steadystate_duration \fR=\fPtime "\fR,\fP ss_dur" \fR=\fPtime
+A rolling window of this duration will be used to judge whether steady state
+has been reached. Data will be collected once per second. The default is 0
+which disables steady state detection. When the unit is omitted, the
+value is interpreted in seconds.
 .TP
-.BI replay_scale \fR=\fPint
-Scale sector offsets down by this factor when replaying traces.
+.BI steadystate_ramp_time \fR=\fPtime "\fR,\fP ss_ramp" \fR=\fPtime
+Allow the job to run for the specified duration before beginning data
+collection for checking the steady state job termination criterion. The
+default is 0. When the unit is omitted, the value is interpreted in seconds.
+.SS "Measurements and reporting"
 .TP
 .BI per_job_logs \fR=\fPbool
 If set, this generates bw/clat/iops log with per file private filenames. If
-not set, jobs with identical names will share the log filename. Default: true.
+not set, jobs with identical names will share the log filename. Default:
+true.
+.TP
+.BI group_reporting
+It may sometimes be interesting to display statistics for groups of jobs as
+a whole instead of for each individual job. This is especially true if
+\fBnumjobs\fR is used; looking at individual thread/process output
+quickly becomes unwieldy. To see the final report per\-group instead of
+per\-job, use \fBgroup_reporting\fR. Jobs in a file will be part of the
+same reporting group, unless if separated by a \fBstonewall\fR, or by
+using \fBnew_group\fR.
+.TP
+.BI new_group
+Start a new reporting group. See: \fBgroup_reporting\fR. If not given,
+all jobs in a file will be part of the same reporting group, unless
+separated by a \fBstonewall\fR.
+.TP
+.BI stats \fR=\fPbool
+By default, fio collects and shows final output results for all jobs
+that run. If this option is set to 0, then fio will ignore it in
+the final stat output.
 .TP
 .BI write_bw_log \fR=\fPstr
-If given, write a bandwidth log of the jobs in this job file. Can be used to
-store data of the bandwidth of the jobs in their lifetime. The included
-fio_generate_plots script uses gnuplot to turn these text files into nice
-graphs. See \fBwrite_lat_log\fR for behaviour of given filename. For this
-option, the postfix is _bw.x.log, where x is the index of the job (1..N,
-where N is the number of jobs). If \fBper_job_logs\fR is false, then the
-filename will not include the job index. See the \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR
-section.
+If given, write a bandwidth log for this job. Can be used to store data of
+the bandwidth of the jobs in their lifetime. The included
+\fBfio_generate_plots\fR script uses gnuplot to turn these
+text files into nice graphs. See \fBwrite_lat_log\fR for behavior of
+given filename. For this option, the postfix is `_bw.x.log', where `x'
+is the index of the job (1..N, where N is the number of jobs). If
+\fBper_job_logs\fR is false, then the filename will not include the job
+index. See \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
 .TP
 .BI write_lat_log \fR=\fPstr
-Same as \fBwrite_bw_log\fR, but writes I/O completion latencies.  If no
-filename is given with this option, the default filename of
-"jobname_type.x.log" is used, where x is the index of the job (1..N, where
-N is the number of jobs). Even if the filename is given, fio will still
-append the type of log. If \fBper_job_logs\fR is false, then the filename will
-not include the job index. See the \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
+Same as \fBwrite_bw_log\fR, except that this option stores I/O
+submission, completion, and total latencies instead. If no filename is given
+with this option, the default filename of `jobname_type.log' is
+used. Even if the filename is given, fio will still append the type of
+log. So if one specifies:
+.RS
+.RS
+.P
+write_lat_log=foo
+.RE
+.P
+The actual log names will be `foo_slat.x.log', `foo_clat.x.log',
+and `foo_lat.x.log', where `x' is the index of the job (1..N, where N
+is the number of jobs). This helps \fBfio_generate_plots\fR find the
+logs automatically. If \fBper_job_logs\fR is false, then the filename
+will not include the job index. See \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
+.RE
+.TP
+.BI write_hist_log \fR=\fPstr
+Same as \fBwrite_lat_log\fR, but writes I/O completion latency
+histograms. If no filename is given with this option, the default filename
+of `jobname_clat_hist.x.log' is used, where `x' is the index of the
+job (1..N, where N is the number of jobs). Even if the filename is given,
+fio will still append the type of log. If \fBper_job_logs\fR is false,
+then the filename will not include the job index. See \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
 .TP
 .BI write_iops_log \fR=\fPstr
-Same as \fBwrite_bw_log\fR, but writes IOPS. If no filename is given with this
-option, the default filename of "jobname_type.x.log" is used, where x is the
-index of the job (1..N, where N is the number of jobs). Even if the filename
-is given, fio will still append the type of log. If \fBper_job_logs\fR is false,
-then the filename will not include the job index. See the \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR
-section.
+Same as \fBwrite_bw_log\fR, but writes IOPS. If no filename is given
+with this option, the default filename of `jobname_type.x.log' is
+used, where `x' is the index of the job (1..N, where N is the number of
+jobs). Even if the filename is given, fio will still append the type of
+log. If \fBper_job_logs\fR is false, then the filename will not include
+the job index. See \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
 .TP
 .BI log_avg_msec \fR=\fPint
 By default, fio will log an entry in the iops, latency, or bw log for every
-IO that completes. When writing to the disk log, that can quickly grow to a
+I/O that completes. When writing to the disk log, that can quickly grow to a
 very large size. Setting this option makes fio average the each log entry
 over the specified period of time, reducing the resolution of the log. See
-\fBlog_max_value\fR as well.  Defaults to 0, logging all entries.
+\fBlog_max_value\fR as well. Defaults to 0, logging all entries.
+Also see \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
+.TP
+.BI log_hist_msec \fR=\fPint
+Same as \fBlog_avg_msec\fR, but logs entries for completion latency
+histograms. Computing latency percentiles from averages of intervals using
+\fBlog_avg_msec\fR is inaccurate. Setting this option makes fio log
+histogram entries over the specified period of time, reducing log sizes for
+high IOPS devices while retaining percentile accuracy. See
+\fBlog_hist_coarseness\fR as well. Defaults to 0, meaning histogram
+logging is disabled.
+.TP
+.BI log_hist_coarseness \fR=\fPint
+Integer ranging from 0 to 6, defining the coarseness of the resolution of
+the histogram logs enabled with \fBlog_hist_msec\fR. For each increment
+in coarseness, fio outputs half as many bins. Defaults to 0, for which
+histogram logs contain 1216 latency bins. See \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
 .TP
 .BI log_max_value \fR=\fPbool
-If \fBlog_avg_msec\fR is set, fio logs the average over that window. If you
-instead want to log the maximum value, set this option to 1.  Defaults to
+If \fBlog_avg_msec\fR is set, fio logs the average over that window. If
+you instead want to log the maximum value, set this option to 1. Defaults to
 0, meaning that averaged values are logged.
 .TP
 .BI log_offset \fR=\fPbool
-If this is set, the iolog options will include the byte offset for the IO
-entry as well as the other data values.
+If this is set, the iolog options will include the byte offset for the I/O
+entry as well as the other data values. Defaults to 0 meaning that
+offsets are not present in logs. Also see \fBLOG FILE FORMATS\fR section.
 .TP
 .BI log_compression \fR=\fPint
-If this is set, fio will compress the IO logs as it goes, to keep the memory
-footprint lower. When a log reaches the specified size, that chunk is removed
-and compressed in the background. Given that IO logs are fairly highly
-compressible, this yields a nice memory savings for longer runs. The downside
-is that the compression will consume some background CPU cycles, so it may
-impact the run. This, however, is also true if the logging ends up consuming
-most of the system memory. So pick your poison. The IO logs are saved
-normally at the end of a run, by decompressing the chunks and storing them
-in the specified log file. This feature depends on the availability of zlib.
+If this is set, fio will compress the I/O logs as it goes, to keep the
+memory footprint lower. When a log reaches the specified size, that chunk is
+removed and compressed in the background. Given that I/O logs are fairly
+highly compressible, this yields a nice memory savings for longer runs. The
+downside is that the compression will consume some background CPU cycles, so
+it may impact the run. This, however, is also true if the logging ends up
+consuming most of the system memory. So pick your poison. The I/O logs are
+saved normally at the end of a run, by decompressing the chunks and storing
+them in the specified log file. This feature depends on the availability of
+zlib.
 .TP
 .BI log_compression_cpus \fR=\fPstr
-Define the set of CPUs that are allowed to handle online log compression
-for the IO jobs. This can provide better isolation between performance
+Define the set of CPUs that are allowed to handle online log compression for
+the I/O jobs. This can provide better isolation between performance
 sensitive jobs, and background compression work.
 .TP
 .BI log_store_compressed \fR=\fPbool
 If set, fio will store the log files in a compressed format. They can be
-decompressed with fio, using the \fB\-\-inflate-log\fR command line parameter.
-The files will be stored with a \fB\.fz\fR suffix.
-.TP
-.BI block_error_percentiles \fR=\fPbool
-If set, record errors in trim block-sized units from writes and trims and output
-a histogram of how many trims it took to get to errors, and what kind of error
-was encountered.
-.TP
-.BI disable_lat \fR=\fPbool
-Disable measurements of total latency numbers. Useful only for cutting
-back the number of calls to \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2), as that does impact performance at
-really high IOPS rates.  Note that to really get rid of a large amount of these
-calls, this option must be used with disable_slat and disable_bw as well.
-.TP
-.BI disable_clat \fR=\fPbool
-Disable measurements of completion latency numbers. See \fBdisable_lat\fR.
-.TP
-.BI disable_slat \fR=\fPbool
-Disable measurements of submission latency numbers. See \fBdisable_lat\fR.
-.TP
-.BI disable_bw_measurement \fR=\fPbool
-Disable measurements of throughput/bandwidth numbers. See \fBdisable_lat\fR.
+decompressed with fio, using the \fB\-\-inflate\-log\fR command line
+parameter. The files will be stored with a `.fz' suffix.
 .TP
-.BI lockmem \fR=\fPint
-Pin the specified amount of memory with \fBmlock\fR\|(2).  Can be used to
-simulate a smaller amount of memory. The amount specified is per worker.
+.BI log_unix_epoch \fR=\fPbool
+If set, fio will log Unix timestamps to the log files produced by enabling
+write_type_log for each log type, instead of the default zero\-based
+timestamps.
 .TP
-.BI exec_prerun \fR=\fPstr
-Before running the job, execute the specified command with \fBsystem\fR\|(3).
-.RS
-Output is redirected in a file called \fBjobname.prerun.txt\fR
-.RE
+.BI block_error_percentiles \fR=\fPbool
+If set, record errors in trim block\-sized units from writes and trims and
+output a histogram of how many trims it took to get to errors, and what kind
+of error was encountered.
 .TP
-.BI exec_postrun \fR=\fPstr
-Same as \fBexec_prerun\fR, but the command is executed after the job completes.
-.RS
-Output is redirected in a file called \fBjobname.postrun.txt\fR
-.RE
+.BI bwavgtime \fR=\fPint
+Average the calculated bandwidth over the given time. Value is specified in
+milliseconds. If the job also does bandwidth logging through
+\fBwrite_bw_log\fR, then the minimum of this option and
+\fBlog_avg_msec\fR will be used. Default: 500ms.
 .TP
-.BI ioscheduler \fR=\fPstr
-Attempt to switch the device hosting the file to the specified I/O scheduler.
+.BI iopsavgtime \fR=\fPint
+Average the calculated IOPS over the given time. Value is specified in
+milliseconds. If the job also does IOPS logging through
+\fBwrite_iops_log\fR, then the minimum of this option and
+\fBlog_avg_msec\fR will be used. Default: 500ms.
 .TP
 .BI disk_util \fR=\fPbool
-Generate disk utilization statistics if the platform supports it. Default: true.
-.TP
-.BI clocksource \fR=\fPstr
-Use the given clocksource as the base of timing. The supported options are:
-.RS
+Generate disk utilization statistics, if the platform supports it.
+Default: true.
 .TP
-.B gettimeofday
-\fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2)
+.BI disable_lat \fR=\fPbool
+Disable measurements of total latency numbers. Useful only for cutting back
+the number of calls to \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2), as that does impact
+performance at really high IOPS rates. Note that to really get rid of a
+large amount of these calls, this option must be used with
+\fBdisable_slat\fR and \fBdisable_bw_measurement\fR as well.
 .TP
-.B clock_gettime
-\fBclock_gettime\fR\|(2)
+.BI disable_clat \fR=\fPbool
+Disable measurements of completion latency numbers. See
+\fBdisable_lat\fR.
 .TP
-.B cpu
-Internal CPU clock source
+.BI disable_slat \fR=\fPbool
+Disable measurements of submission latency numbers. See
+\fBdisable_lat\fR.
 .TP
-.RE
-.P
-\fBcpu\fR is the preferred clocksource if it is reliable, as it is very fast
-(and fio is heavy on time calls). Fio will automatically use this clocksource
-if it's supported and considered reliable on the system it is running on,
-unless another clocksource is specifically set. For x86/x86-64 CPUs, this
-means supporting TSC Invariant.
+.BI disable_bw_measurement \fR=\fPbool "\fR,\fP disable_bw" \fR=\fPbool
+Disable measurements of throughput/bandwidth numbers. See
+\fBdisable_lat\fR.
 .TP
-.BI gtod_reduce \fR=\fPbool
-Enable all of the \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) reducing options (disable_clat, disable_slat,
-disable_bw) plus reduce precision of the timeout somewhat to really shrink the
-\fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) call count. With this option enabled, we only do about 0.4% of
-the gtod() calls we would have done if all time keeping was enabled.
+.BI clat_percentiles \fR=\fPbool
+Enable the reporting of percentiles of completion latencies. This option is
+mutually exclusive with \fBlat_percentiles\fR.
 .TP
-.BI gtod_cpu \fR=\fPint
-Sometimes it's cheaper to dedicate a single thread of execution to just getting
-the current time. Fio (and databases, for instance) are very intensive on
-\fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) calls. With this option, you can set one CPU aside for doing
-nothing but logging current time to a shared memory location. Then the other
-threads/processes that run IO workloads need only copy that segment, instead of
-entering the kernel with a \fBgettimeofday\fR\|(2) call. The CPU set aside for doing
-these time calls will be excluded from other uses. Fio will manually clear it
-from the CPU mask of other jobs.
+.BI lat_percentiles \fR=\fPbool
+Enable the reporting of percentiles of IO latencies. This is similar to
+\fBclat_percentiles\fR, except that this includes the submission latency.
+This option is mutually exclusive with \fBclat_percentiles\fR.
 .TP
-.BI ignore_error \fR=\fPstr
-Sometimes you want to ignore some errors during test in that case you can specify
-error list for each error type.
-.br
-ignore_error=READ_ERR_LIST,WRITE_ERR_LIST,VERIFY_ERR_LIST
-.br
-errors for given error type is separated with ':'.
-Error may be symbol ('ENOSPC', 'ENOMEM') or an integer.
-.br
-Example: ignore_error=EAGAIN,ENOSPC:122 .
-.br
-This option will ignore EAGAIN from READ, and ENOSPC and 122(EDQUOT) from WRITE.
+.BI percentile_list \fR=\fPfloat_list
+Overwrite the default list of percentiles for completion latencies and the
+block error histogram. Each number is a floating number in the range
+(0,100], and the maximum length of the list is 20. Use ':' to separate the
+numbers, and list the numbers in ascending order. For example,
+`\-\-percentile_list=99.5:99.9' will cause fio to report the values of
+completion latency below which 99.5% and 99.9% of the observed latencies
+fell, respectively.
+.SS "Error handling"
 .TP
-.BI error_dump \fR=\fPbool
-If set dump every error even if it is non fatal, true by default. If disabled
-only fatal error will be dumped
+.BI exitall_on_error
+When one job finishes in error, terminate the rest. The default is to wait
+for each job to finish.
 .TP
-.BI profile \fR=\fPstr
-Select a specific builtin performance test.
+.BI continue_on_error \fR=\fPstr
+Normally fio will exit the job on the first observed failure. If this option
+is set, fio will continue the job when there is a 'non\-fatal error' (EIO or
+EILSEQ) until the runtime is exceeded or the I/O size specified is
+completed. If this option is used, there are two more stats that are
+appended, the total error count and the first error. The error field given
+in the stats is the first error that was hit during the run.
+The allowed values are:
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.BI cgroup \fR=\fPstr
-Add job to this control group. If it doesn't exist, it will be created.
-The system must have a mounted cgroup blkio mount point for this to work. If
-your system doesn't have it mounted, you can do so with:
-
-# mount \-t cgroup \-o blkio none /cgroup
+.B none
+Exit on any I/O or verify errors.
 .TP
-.BI cgroup_weight \fR=\fPint
-Set the weight of the cgroup to this value. See the documentation that comes
-with the kernel, allowed values are in the range of 100..1000.
+.B read
+Continue on read errors, exit on all others.
 .TP
-.BI cgroup_nodelete \fR=\fPbool
-Normally fio will delete the cgroups it has created after the job completion.
-To override this behavior and to leave cgroups around after the job completion,
-set cgroup_nodelete=1. This can be useful if one wants to inspect various
-cgroup files after job completion. Default: false
+.B write
+Continue on write errors, exit on all others.
 .TP
-.BI uid \fR=\fPint
-Instead of running as the invoking user, set the user ID to this value before
-the thread/process does any work.
+.B io
+Continue on any I/O error, exit on all others.
 .TP
-.BI gid \fR=\fPint
-Set group ID, see \fBuid\fR.
+.B verify
+Continue on verify errors, exit on all others.
 .TP
-.BI unit_base \fR=\fPint
-Base unit for reporting.  Allowed values are:
-.RS
+.B all
+Continue on all errors.
 .TP
 .B 0
-Use auto-detection (default).
-.TP
-.B 8
-Byte based.
+Backward\-compatible alias for 'none'.
 .TP
 .B 1
-Bit based.
+Backward\-compatible alias for 'all'.
+.RE
 .RE
-.P
-.TP
-.BI flow_id \fR=\fPint
-The ID of the flow. If not specified, it defaults to being a global flow. See
-\fBflow\fR.
-.TP
-.BI flow \fR=\fPint
-Weight in token-based flow control. If this value is used, then there is a
-\fBflow counter\fR which is used to regulate the proportion of activity between
-two or more jobs. fio attempts to keep this flow counter near zero. The
-\fBflow\fR parameter stands for how much should be added or subtracted to the
-flow counter on each iteration of the main I/O loop. That is, if one job has
-\fBflow=8\fR and another job has \fBflow=-1\fR, then there will be a roughly
-1:8 ratio in how much one runs vs the other.
-.TP
-.BI flow_watermark \fR=\fPint
-The maximum value that the absolute value of the flow counter is allowed to
-reach before the job must wait for a lower value of the counter.
-.TP
-.BI flow_sleep \fR=\fPint
-The period of time, in microseconds, to wait after the flow watermark has been
-exceeded before retrying operations
-.TP
-.BI clat_percentiles \fR=\fPbool
-Enable the reporting of percentiles of completion latencies.
-.TP
-.BI percentile_list \fR=\fPfloat_list
-Overwrite the default list of percentiles for completion latencies and the
-block error histogram. Each number is a floating number in the range (0,100],
-and the maximum length of the list is 20. Use ':' to separate the
-numbers. For example, \-\-percentile_list=99.5:99.9 will cause fio to
-report the values of completion latency below which 99.5% and 99.9% of
-the observed latencies fell, respectively.
-.SS "Ioengine Parameters List"
-Some parameters are only valid when a specific ioengine is in use. These are
-used identically to normal parameters, with the caveat that when used on the
-command line, they must come after the ioengine.
-.TP
-.BI (cpu)cpuload \fR=\fPint
-Attempt to use the specified percentage of CPU cycles.
-.TP
-.BI (cpu)cpuchunks \fR=\fPint
-Split the load into cycles of the given time. In microseconds.
-.TP
-.BI (cpu)exit_on_io_done \fR=\fPbool
-Detect when IO threads are done, then exit.
-.TP
-.BI (libaio)userspace_reap
-Normally, with the libaio engine in use, fio will use
-the io_getevents system call to reap newly returned events.
-With this flag turned on, the AIO ring will be read directly
-from user-space to reap events. The reaping mode is only
-enabled when polling for a minimum of 0 events (eg when
-iodepth_batch_complete=0).
-.TP
-.BI (psyncv2)hipri
-Set RWF_HIPRI on IO, indicating to the kernel that it's of
-higher priority than normal.
-.TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)hostname \fR=\fPstr
-The host name or IP address to use for TCP or UDP based IO.
-If the job is a TCP listener or UDP reader, the hostname is not
-used and must be omitted unless it is a valid UDP multicast address.
-.TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)port \fR=\fPint
-The TCP or UDP port to bind to or connect to. If this is used with
-\fBnumjobs\fR to spawn multiple instances of the same job type, then
-this will be the starting port number since fio will use a range of ports.
-.TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)interface \fR=\fPstr
-The IP address of the network interface used to send or receive UDP multicast
-packets.
-.TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)ttl \fR=\fPint
-Time-to-live value for outgoing UDP multicast packets. Default: 1
-.TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)nodelay \fR=\fPbool
-Set TCP_NODELAY on TCP connections.
 .TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)protocol \fR=\fPstr "\fR,\fP proto" \fR=\fPstr
-The network protocol to use. Accepted values are:
+.BI ignore_error \fR=\fPstr
+Sometimes you want to ignore some errors during test in that case you can
+specify error list for each error type, instead of only being able to
+ignore the default 'non\-fatal error' using \fBcontinue_on_error\fR.
+`ignore_error=READ_ERR_LIST,WRITE_ERR_LIST,VERIFY_ERR_LIST' errors for
+given error type is separated with ':'. Error may be symbol ('ENOSPC', 'ENOMEM')
+or integer. Example:
 .RS
 .RS
+.P
+ignore_error=EAGAIN,ENOSPC:122
+.RE
+.P
+This option will ignore EAGAIN from READ, and ENOSPC and 122(EDQUOT) from
+WRITE. This option works by overriding \fBcontinue_on_error\fR with
+the list of errors for each error type if any.
+.RE
 .TP
-.B tcp
-Transmission control protocol
-.TP
-.B tcpv6
-Transmission control protocol V6
+.BI error_dump \fR=\fPbool
+If set dump every error even if it is non fatal, true by default. If
+disabled only fatal error will be dumped.
+.SS "Running predefined workloads"
+Fio includes predefined profiles that mimic the I/O workloads generated by
+other tools.
 .TP
-.B udp
-User datagram protocol
+.BI profile \fR=\fPstr
+The predefined workload to run. Current profiles are:
+.RS
+.RS
 .TP
-.B udpv6
-User datagram protocol V6
+.B tiobench
+Threaded I/O bench (tiotest/tiobench) like workload.
 .TP
-.B unix
-UNIX domain socket
+.B act
+Aerospike Certification Tool (ACT) like workload.
+.RE
 .RE
 .P
-When the protocol is TCP or UDP, the port must also be given,
-as well as the hostname if the job is a TCP listener or UDP
-reader. For unix sockets, the normal filename option should be
-used and the port is invalid.
+To view a profile's additional options use \fB\-\-cmdhelp\fR after specifying
+the profile. For example:
+.RS
+.TP
+$ fio \-\-profile=act \-\-cmdhelp
 .RE
+.SS "Act profile options"
 .TP
-.BI (net,netsplice)listen
-For TCP network connections, tell fio to listen for incoming
-connections rather than initiating an outgoing connection. The
-hostname must be omitted if this option is used.
+.BI device\-names \fR=\fPstr
+Devices to use.
 .TP
-.BI (net, pingpong) \fR=\fPbool
-Normally a network writer will just continue writing data, and a network reader
-will just consume packets. If pingpong=1 is set, a writer will send its normal
-payload to the reader, then wait for the reader to send the same payload back.
-This allows fio to measure network latencies. The submission and completion
-latencies then measure local time spent sending or receiving, and the
-completion latency measures how long it took for the other end to receive and
-send back. For UDP multicast traffic pingpong=1 should only be set for a single
-reader when multiple readers are listening to the same address.
+.BI load \fR=\fPint
+ACT load multiplier. Default: 1.
 .TP
-.BI (net, window_size) \fR=\fPint
-Set the desired socket buffer size for the connection.
+.BI test\-duration\fR=\fPtime
+How long the entire test takes to run. When the unit is omitted, the value
+is given in seconds. Default: 24h.
 .TP
-.BI (net, mss) \fR=\fPint
-Set the TCP maximum segment size (TCP_MAXSEG).
+.BI threads\-per\-queue\fR=\fPint
+Number of read I/O threads per device. Default: 8.
 .TP
-.BI (e4defrag,donorname) \fR=\fPstr
-File will be used as a block donor (swap extents between files)
+.BI read\-req\-num\-512\-blocks\fR=\fPint
+Number of 512B blocks to read at the time. Default: 3.
 .TP
-.BI (e4defrag,inplace) \fR=\fPint
-Configure donor file block allocation strategy
-.RS
-.BI 0(default) :
-Preallocate donor's file on init
+.BI large\-block\-op\-kbytes\fR=\fPint
+Size of large block ops in KiB (writes). Default: 131072.
 .TP
-.BI 1:
-allocate space immediately inside defragment event, and free right after event
-.RE
-.TP 
-.BI (rbd)clustername \fR=\fPstr
-Specifies the name of the ceph cluster.
+.BI prep
+Set to run ACT prep phase.
+.SS "Tiobench profile options"
 .TP
-.BI (rbd)rbdname \fR=\fPstr
-Specifies the name of the RBD.
+.BI size\fR=\fPstr
+Size in MiB.
 .TP
-.BI (rbd)pool \fR=\fPstr
-Specifies the name of the Ceph pool containing the RBD.
+.BI block\fR=\fPint
+Block size in bytes. Default: 4096.
 .TP
-.BI (rbd)clientname \fR=\fPstr
-Specifies the username (without the 'client.' prefix) used to access the Ceph
-cluster. If the clustername is specified, the clientname shall be the full
-type.id string. If no type. prefix is given, fio will add 'client.' by default.
+.BI numruns\fR=\fPint
+Number of runs.
 .TP
-.BI (mtd)skipbad \fR=\fPbool
-Skip operations against known bad blocks.
+.BI dir\fR=\fPstr
+Test directory.
+.TP
+.BI threads\fR=\fPint
+Number of threads.
 .SH OUTPUT
-While running, \fBfio\fR will display the status of the created jobs.  For
-example:
-.RS
-.P
-Threads: 1: [_r] [24.8% done] [ 13509/  8334 kb/s] [eta 00h:01m:31s]
-.RE
+Fio spits out a lot of output. While running, fio will display the status of the
+jobs created. An example of that would be:
 .P
-The characters in the first set of brackets denote the current status of each
-threads.  The possible values are:
+.nf
+               Jobs: 1 (f=1): [_(1),M(1)][24.8%][r=20.5MiB/s,w=23.5MiB/s][r=82,w=94 IOPS][eta 01m:31s]
+.fi
 .P
-.PD 0
+The characters inside the first set of square brackets denote the current status of
+each thread. The first character is the first job defined in the job file, and so
+forth. The possible values (in typical life cycle order) are:
 .RS
 .TP
+.PD 0
 .B P
-Setup but not started.
+Thread setup, but not started.
 .TP
 .B C
 Thread created.
 .TP
 .B I
-Initialized, waiting.
+Thread initialized, waiting or generating necessary data.
+.TP
+.B P
+Thread running pre\-reading file(s).
+.TP
+.B /
+Thread is in ramp period.
 .TP
 .B R
 Running, doing sequential reads.
@@ -1835,556 +2734,759 @@ Running, doing mixed sequential reads/writes.
 .B m
 Running, doing mixed random reads/writes.
 .TP
+.B D
+Running, doing sequential trims.
+.TP
+.B d
+Running, doing random trims.
+.TP
 .B F
 Running, currently waiting for \fBfsync\fR\|(2).
 .TP
 .B V
-Running, verifying written data.
+Running, doing verification of written data.
+.TP
+.B f
+Thread finishing.
 .TP
 .B E
-Exited, not reaped by main thread.
+Thread exited, not reaped by main thread yet.
 .TP
 .B \-
-Exited, thread reaped.
-.RE
+Thread reaped.
+.TP
+.B X
+Thread reaped, exited with an error.
+.TP
+.B K
+Thread reaped, exited due to signal.
 .PD
+.RE
+.P
+Fio will condense the thread string as not to take up more space on the command
+line than needed. For instance, if you have 10 readers and 10 writers running,
+the output would look like this:
+.P
+.nf
+               Jobs: 20 (f=20): [R(10),W(10)][4.0%][r=20.5MiB/s,w=23.5MiB/s][r=82,w=94 IOPS][eta 57m:36s]
+.fi
+.P
+Note that the status string is displayed in order, so it's possible to tell which of
+the jobs are currently doing what. In the example above this means that jobs 1\-\-10
+are readers and 11\-\-20 are writers.
+.P
+The other values are fairly self explanatory \-\- number of threads currently
+running and doing I/O, the number of currently open files (f=), the estimated
+completion percentage, the rate of I/O since last check (read speed listed first,
+then write speed and optionally trim speed) in terms of bandwidth and IOPS,
+and time to completion for the current running group. It's impossible to estimate
+runtime of the following groups (if any).
 .P
-The second set of brackets shows the estimated completion percentage of
-the current group.  The third set shows the read and write I/O rate,
-respectively. Finally, the estimated run time of the job is displayed.
+When fio is done (or interrupted by Ctrl\-C), it will show the data for
+each thread, group of threads, and disks in that order. For each overall thread (or
+group) the output looks like:
 .P
-When \fBfio\fR completes (or is interrupted by Ctrl-C), it will show data
-for each thread, each group of threads, and each disk, in that order.
+.nf
+               Client1: (groupid=0, jobs=1): err= 0: pid=16109: Sat Jun 24 12:07:54 2017
+                 write: IOPS=88, BW=623KiB/s (638kB/s)(30.4MiB/50032msec)
+                   slat (nsec): min=500, max=145500, avg=8318.00, stdev=4781.50
+                   clat (usec): min=170, max=78367, avg=4019.02, stdev=8293.31
+                    lat (usec): min=174, max=78375, avg=4027.34, stdev=8291.79
+                   clat percentiles (usec):
+                    |  1.00th=[  302],  5.00th=[  326], 10.00th=[  343], 20.00th=[  363],
+                    | 30.00th=[  392], 40.00th=[  404], 50.00th=[  416], 60.00th=[  445],
+                    | 70.00th=[  816], 80.00th=[ 6718], 90.00th=[12911], 95.00th=[21627],
+                    | 99.00th=[43779], 99.50th=[51643], 99.90th=[68682], 99.95th=[72877],
+                    | 99.99th=[78119]
+                  bw (  KiB/s): min=  532, max=  686, per=0.10%, avg=622.87, stdev=24.82, samples=  100
+                  iops        : min=   76, max=   98, avg=88.98, stdev= 3.54, samples=  100
+                 lat (usec)   : 250=0.04%, 500=64.11%, 750=4.81%, 1000=2.79%
+                 lat (msec)   : 2=4.16%, 4=1.84%, 10=4.90%, 20=11.33%, 50=5.37%
+                 lat (msec)   : 100=0.65%
+                 cpu          : usr=0.27%, sys=0.18%, ctx=12072, majf=0, minf=21
+                 IO depths    : 1=85.0%, 2=13.1%, 4=1.8%, 8=0.1%, 16=0.0%, 32=0.0%, >=64=0.0%
+                    submit    : 0=0.0%, 4=100.0%, 8=0.0%, 16=0.0%, 32=0.0%, 64=0.0%, >=64=0.0%
+                    complete  : 0=0.0%, 4=100.0%, 8=0.0%, 16=0.0%, 32=0.0%, 64=0.0%, >=64=0.0%
+                    issued rwt: total=0,4450,0, short=0,0,0, dropped=0,0,0
+                    latency   : target=0, window=0, percentile=100.00%, depth=8
+.fi
 .P
-Per-thread statistics first show the threads client number, group-id, and
-error code.  The remaining figures are as follows:
+The job name (or first job's name when using \fBgroup_reporting\fR) is printed,
+along with the group id, count of jobs being aggregated, last error id seen (which
+is 0 when there are no errors), pid/tid of that thread and the time the job/group
+completed. Below are the I/O statistics for each data direction performed (showing
+writes in the example above). In the order listed, they denote:
 .RS
 .TP
-.B io
-Number of megabytes of I/O performed.
-.TP
-.B bw
-Average data rate (bandwidth).
-.TP
-.B runt
-Threads run time.
+.B read/write/trim
+The string before the colon shows the I/O direction the statistics
+are for. \fIIOPS\fR is the average I/Os performed per second. \fIBW\fR
+is the average bandwidth rate shown as: value in power of 2 format
+(value in power of 10 format). The last two values show: (total
+I/O performed in power of 2 format / \fIruntime\fR of that thread).
 .TP
 .B slat
-Submission latency minimum, maximum, average and standard deviation. This is
-the time it took to submit the I/O.
+Submission latency (\fImin\fR being the minimum, \fImax\fR being the
+maximum, \fIavg\fR being the average, \fIstdev\fR being the standard
+deviation). This is the time it took to submit the I/O. For
+sync I/O this row is not displayed as the slat is really the
+completion latency (since queue/complete is one operation there).
+This value can be in nanoseconds, microseconds or milliseconds \-\-\-
+fio will choose the most appropriate base and print that (in the
+example above nanoseconds was the best scale). Note: in \fB\-\-minimal\fR mode
+latencies are always expressed in microseconds.
 .TP
 .B clat
-Completion latency minimum, maximum, average and standard deviation.  This
-is the time between submission and completion.
+Completion latency. Same names as slat, this denotes the time from
+submission to completion of the I/O pieces. For sync I/O, clat will
+usually be equal (or very close) to 0, as the time from submit to
+complete is basically just CPU time (I/O has already been done, see slat
+explanation).
+.TP
+.B lat
+Total latency. Same names as slat and clat, this denotes the time from
+when fio created the I/O unit to completion of the I/O operation.
 .TP
 .B bw
-Bandwidth minimum, maximum, percentage of aggregate bandwidth received, average
-and standard deviation.
+Bandwidth statistics based on samples. Same names as the xlat stats,
+but also includes the number of samples taken (\fIsamples\fR) and an
+approximate percentage of total aggregate bandwidth this thread
+received in its group (\fIper\fR). This last value is only really
+useful if the threads in this group are on the same disk, since they
+are then competing for disk access.
+.TP
+.B iops
+IOPS statistics based on samples. Same names as \fBbw\fR.
+.TP
+.B lat (nsec/usec/msec)
+The distribution of I/O completion latencies. This is the time from when
+I/O leaves fio and when it gets completed. Unlike the separate
+read/write/trim sections above, the data here and in the remaining
+sections apply to all I/Os for the reporting group. 250=0.04% means that
+0.04% of the I/Os completed in under 250us. 500=64.11% means that 64.11%
+of the I/Os required 250 to 499us for completion.
 .TP
 .B cpu
-CPU usage statistics. Includes user and system time, number of context switches
-this thread went through and number of major and minor page faults. The CPU
-utilization numbers are averages for the jobs in that reporting group, while
-the context and fault counters are summed.
-.TP
-.B IO depths
-Distribution of I/O depths.  Each depth includes everything less than (or equal)
-to it, but greater than the previous depth.
-.TP
-.B IO issued
-Number of read/write requests issued, and number of short read/write requests.
+CPU usage. User and system time, along with the number of context
+switches this thread went through, usage of system and user time, and
+finally the number of major and minor page faults. The CPU utilization
+numbers are averages for the jobs in that reporting group, while the
+context and fault counters are summed.
 .TP
-.B IO latencies
-Distribution of I/O completion latencies.  The numbers follow the same pattern
-as \fBIO depths\fR.
+.B IO depths
+The distribution of I/O depths over the job lifetime. The numbers are
+divided into powers of 2 and each entry covers depths from that value
+up to those that are lower than the next entry \-\- e.g., 16= covers
+depths from 16 to 31. Note that the range covered by a depth
+distribution entry can be different to the range covered by the
+equivalent \fBsubmit\fR/\fBcomplete\fR distribution entry.
+.TP
+.B IO submit
+How many pieces of I/O were submitting in a single submit call. Each
+entry denotes that amount and below, until the previous entry \-\- e.g.,
+16=100% means that we submitted anywhere between 9 to 16 I/Os per submit
+call. Note that the range covered by a \fBsubmit\fR distribution entry can
+be different to the range covered by the equivalent depth distribution
+entry.
+.TP
+.B IO complete
+Like the above \fBsubmit\fR number, but for completions instead.
+.TP
+.B IO issued rwt
+The number of \fBread/write/trim\fR requests issued, and how many of them were
+short or dropped.
+.TP
+.B IO latency
+These values are for \fBlatency-target\fR and related options. When
+these options are engaged, this section describes the I/O depth required
+to meet the specified latency target.
 .RE
 .P
-The group statistics show:
-.PD 0
+After each client has been listed, the group statistics are printed. They
+will look like this:
+.P
+.nf
+               Run status group 0 (all jobs):
+                  READ: bw=20.9MiB/s (21.9MB/s), 10.4MiB/s\-10.8MiB/s (10.9MB/s\-11.3MB/s), io=64.0MiB (67.1MB), run=2973\-3069msec
+                 WRITE: bw=1231KiB/s (1261kB/s), 616KiB/s\-621KiB/s (630kB/s\-636kB/s), io=64.0MiB (67.1MB), run=52747\-53223msec
+.fi
+.P
+For each data direction it prints:
 .RS
 .TP
-.B io
-Number of megabytes I/O performed.
-.TP
-.B aggrb
-Aggregate bandwidth of threads in the group.
-.TP
-.B minb
-Minimum average bandwidth a thread saw.
-.TP
-.B maxb
-Maximum average bandwidth a thread saw.
+.B bw
+Aggregate bandwidth of threads in this group followed by the
+minimum and maximum bandwidth of all the threads in this group.
+Values outside of brackets are power\-of\-2 format and those
+within are the equivalent value in a power\-of\-10 format.
 .TP
-.B mint
-Shortest runtime of threads in the group.
+.B io
+Aggregate I/O performed of all threads in this group. The
+format is the same as \fBbw\fR.
 .TP
-.B maxt
-Longest runtime of threads in the group.
+.B run
+The smallest and longest runtimes of the threads in this group.
 .RE
-.PD
 .P
-Finally, disk statistics are printed with reads first:
-.PD 0
+And finally, the disk statistics are printed. This is Linux specific.
+They will look like this:
+.P
+.nf
+                 Disk stats (read/write):
+                   sda: ios=16398/16511, merge=30/162, ticks=6853/819634, in_queue=826487, util=100.00%
+.fi
+.P
+Each value is printed for both reads and writes, with reads first. The
+numbers denote:
 .RS
 .TP
 .B ios
 Number of I/Os performed by all groups.
 .TP
 .B merge
-Number of merges in the I/O scheduler.
+Number of merges performed by the I/O scheduler.
 .TP
 .B ticks
 Number of ticks we kept the disk busy.
 .TP
-.B io_queue
+.B in_queue
 Total time spent in the disk queue.
 .TP
 .B util
-Disk utilization.
+The disk utilization. A value of 100% means we kept the disk
+busy constantly, 50% would be a disk idling half of the time.
 .RE
-.PD
 .P
-It is also possible to get fio to dump the current output while it is
-running, without terminating the job. To do that, send fio the \fBUSR1\fR
-signal.
+It is also possible to get fio to dump the current output while it is running,
+without terminating the job. To do that, send fio the USR1 signal. You can
+also get regularly timed dumps by using the \fB\-\-status\-interval\fR
+parameter, or by creating a file in `/tmp' named
+`fio\-dump\-status'. If fio sees this file, it will unlink it and dump the
+current output status.
 .SH TERSE OUTPUT
-If the \fB\-\-minimal\fR / \fB\-\-append-terse\fR options are given, the
-results will be printed/appended in a semicolon-delimited format suitable for
-scripted use.
-A job description (if provided) follows on a new line.  Note that the first
-number in the line is the version number. If the output has to be changed
-for some reason, this number will be incremented by 1 to signify that
-change.  The fields are:
+For scripted usage where you typically want to generate tables or graphs of the
+results, fio can output the results in a semicolon separated format. The format
+is one long line of values, such as:
 .P
-.RS
-.B terse version, fio version, jobname, groupid, error
+.nf
+               2;card0;0;0;7139336;121836;60004;1;10109;27.932460;116.933948;220;126861;3495.446807;1085.368601;226;126864;3523.635629;1089.012448;24063;99944;50.275485%;59818.274627;5540.657370;7155060;122104;60004;1;8338;29.086342;117.839068;388;128077;5032.488518;1234.785715;391;128085;5061.839412;1236.909129;23436;100928;50.287926%;59964.832030;5644.844189;14.595833%;19.394167%;123706;0;7313;0.1%;0.1%;0.1%;0.1%;0.1%;0.1%;100.0%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%;0.01%;0.02%;0.05%;0.16%;6.04%;40.40%;52.68%;0.64%;0.01%;0.00%;0.01%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%;0.00%
+               A description of this job goes here.
+.fi
 .P
-Read status:
-.RS
-.B Total I/O \fR(KB)\fP, bandwidth \fR(KB/s)\fP, IOPS, runtime \fR(ms)\fP
+The job description (if provided) follows on a second line.
 .P
-Submission latency:
-.RS
-.B min, max, mean, standard deviation
-.RE
-Completion latency:
-.RS
-.B min, max, mean, standard deviation
-.RE
-Completion latency percentiles (20 fields):
-.RS
-.B Xth percentile=usec
-.RE
-Total latency:
-.RS
-.B min, max, mean, standard deviation
-.RE
-Bandwidth:
-.RS
-.B min, max, aggregate percentage of total, mean, standard deviation
-.RE
-.RE
+To enable terse output, use the \fB\-\-minimal\fR or
+`\-\-output\-format=terse' command line options. The
+first value is the version of the terse output format. If the output has to be
+changed for some reason, this number will be incremented by 1 to signify that
+change.
 .P
-Write status:
-.RS
-.B Total I/O \fR(KB)\fP, bandwidth \fR(KB/s)\fP, IOPS, runtime \fR(ms)\fP
+Split up, the format is as follows (comments in brackets denote when a
+field was introduced or whether it's specific to some terse version):
 .P
-Submission latency:
+.nf
+                       terse version, fio version [v3], jobname, groupid, error
+.fi
 .RS
-.B min, max, mean, standard deviation
+.P
+.B
+READ status:
 .RE
-Completion latency:
+.P
+.nf
+                       Total IO (KiB), bandwidth (KiB/sec), IOPS, runtime (msec)
+                       Submission latency: min, max, mean, stdev (usec)
+                       Completion latency: min, max, mean, stdev (usec)
+                       Completion latency percentiles: 20 fields (see below)
+                       Total latency: min, max, mean, stdev (usec)
+                       Bw (KiB/s): min, max, aggregate percentage of total, mean, stdev, number of samples [v5]
+                       IOPS [v5]: min, max, mean, stdev, number of samples
+.fi
 .RS
-.B min, max, mean, standard deviation
+.P
+.B
+WRITE status:
 .RE
-Completion latency percentiles (20 fields):
+.P
+.nf
+                       Total IO (KiB), bandwidth (KiB/sec), IOPS, runtime (msec)
+                       Submission latency: min, max, mean, stdev (usec)
+                       Completion latency: min, max, mean, stdev (usec)
+                       Completion latency percentiles: 20 fields (see below)
+                       Total latency: min, max, mean, stdev (usec)
+                       Bw (KiB/s): min, max, aggregate percentage of total, mean, stdev, number of samples [v5]
+                       IOPS [v5]: min, max, mean, stdev, number of samples
+.fi
 .RS
-.B Xth percentile=usec
+.P
+.B
+TRIM status [all but version 3]:
 .RE
-Total latency:
+.P
+.nf
+                       Fields are similar to \fBREAD/WRITE\fR status.
+.fi
 .RS
-.B min, max, mean, standard deviation
+.P
+.B
+CPU usage:
 .RE
-Bandwidth:
+.P
+.nf
+                       user, system, context switches, major faults, minor faults
+.fi
 .RS
-.B min, max, aggregate percentage of total, mean, standard deviation
-.RE
+.P
+.B
+I/O depths:
 .RE
 .P
-CPU usage:
+.nf
+                       <=1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, >=64
+.fi
 .RS
-.B user, system, context switches, major page faults, minor page faults
+.P
+.B
+I/O latencies microseconds:
 .RE
 .P
-IO depth distribution:
+.nf
+                       <=2, 4, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000
+.fi
 .RS
-.B <=1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, >=64
+.P
+.B
+I/O latencies milliseconds:
 .RE
 .P
-IO latency distribution:
-.RS
-Microseconds:
+.nf
+                       <=2, 4, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 2000, >=2000
+.fi
 .RS
-.B <=2, 4, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000
+.P
+.B
+Disk utilization [v3]:
 .RE
-Milliseconds:
+.P
+.nf
+                       disk name, read ios, write ios, read merges, write merges, read ticks, write ticks, time spent in queue, disk utilization percentage
+.fi
 .RS
-.B <=2, 4, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 2000, >=2000
-.RE
+.P
+.B
+Additional Info (dependent on continue_on_error, default off):
 .RE
 .P
-Disk utilization (1 for each disk used):
+.nf
+                       total # errors, first error code
+.fi
 .RS
-.B name, read ios, write ios, read merges, write merges, read ticks, write ticks, read in-queue time, write in-queue time, disk utilization percentage
+.P
+.B
+Additional Info (dependent on description being set):
 .RE
 .P
-Error Info (dependent on continue_on_error, default off):
+.nf
+                       Text description
+.fi
+.P
+Completion latency percentiles can be a grouping of up to 20 sets, so for the
+terse output fio writes all of them. Each field will look like this:
+.P
+.nf
+               1.00%=6112
+.fi
+.P
+which is the Xth percentile, and the `usec' latency associated with it.
+.P
+For \fBDisk utilization\fR, all disks used by fio are shown. So for each disk there
+will be a disk utilization section.
+.P
+Below is a single line containing short names for each of the fields in the
+minimal output v3, separated by semicolons:
+.P
+.nf
+               terse_version_3;fio_version;jobname;groupid;error;read_kb;read_bandwidth;read_iops;read_runtime_ms;read_slat_min;read_slat_max;read_slat_mean;read_slat_dev;read_clat_min;read_clat_max;read_clat_mean;read_clat_dev;read_clat_pct01;read_clat_pct02;read_clat_pct03;read_clat_pct04;read_clat_pct05;read_clat_pct06;read_clat_pct07;read_clat_pct08;read_clat_pct09;read_clat_pct10;read_clat_pct11;read_clat_pct12;read_clat_pct13;read_clat_pct14;read_clat_pct15;read_clat_pct16;read_clat_pct17;read_clat_pct18;read_clat_pct19;read_clat_pct20;read_tlat_min;read_lat_max;read_lat_mean;read_lat_dev;read_bw_min;read_bw_max;read_bw_agg_pct;read_bw_mean;read_bw_dev;write_kb;write_bandwidth;write_iops;write_runtime_ms;write_slat_min;write_slat_max;write_slat_mean;write_slat_dev;write_clat_min;write_clat_max;write_clat_mean;write_clat_dev;write_clat_pct01;write_clat_pct02;write_clat_pct03;write_clat_pct04;write_clat_pct05;write_clat_pct06;write_clat_pct07;write_clat_pct08;write_clat_pct09;write_clat_pct10;write_clat_pct11;write_clat_pct12;write_clat_pct13;write_clat_pct14;write_clat_pct15;write_clat_pct16;write_clat_pct17;write_clat_pct18;write_clat_pct19;write_clat_pct20;write_tlat_min;write_lat_max;write_lat_mean;write_lat_dev;write_bw_min;write_bw_max;write_bw_agg_pct;write_bw_mean;write_bw_dev;cpu_user;cpu_sys;cpu_csw;cpu_mjf;cpu_minf;iodepth_1;iodepth_2;iodepth_4;iodepth_8;iodepth_16;iodepth_32;iodepth_64;lat_2us;lat_4us;lat_10us;lat_20us;lat_50us;lat_100us;lat_250us;lat_500us;lat_750us;lat_1000us;lat_2ms;lat_4ms;lat_10ms;lat_20ms;lat_50ms;lat_100ms;lat_250ms;lat_500ms;lat_750ms;lat_1000ms;lat_2000ms;lat_over_2000ms;disk_name;disk_read_iops;disk_write_iops;disk_read_merges;disk_write_merges;disk_read_ticks;write_ticks;disk_queue_time;disk_util
+.fi
+.SH JSON OUTPUT
+The \fBjson\fR output format is intended to be both human readable and convenient
+for automated parsing. For the most part its sections mirror those of the
+\fBnormal\fR output. The \fBruntime\fR value is reported in msec and the \fBbw\fR value is
+reported in 1024 bytes per second units.
+.fi
+.SH JSON+ OUTPUT
+The \fBjson+\fR output format is identical to the \fBjson\fR output format except that it
+adds a full dump of the completion latency bins. Each \fBbins\fR object contains a
+set of (key, value) pairs where keys are latency durations and values count how
+many I/Os had completion latencies of the corresponding duration. For example,
+consider:
 .RS
-.B total # errors, first error code
-.RE
 .P
-.B text description (if provided in config - appears on newline)
+"bins" : { "87552" : 1, "89600" : 1, "94720" : 1, "96768" : 1, "97792" : 1, "99840" : 1, "100864" : 2, "103936" : 6, "104960" : 534, "105984" : 5995, "107008" : 7529, ... }
 .RE
+.P
+This data indicates that one I/O required 87,552ns to complete, two I/Os required
+100,864ns to complete, and 7529 I/Os required 107,008ns to complete.
+.P
+Also included with fio is a Python script \fBfio_jsonplus_clat2csv\fR that takes
+json+ output and generates CSV\-formatted latency data suitable for plotting.
+.P
+The latency durations actually represent the midpoints of latency intervals.
+For details refer to `stat.h' in the fio source.
 .SH TRACE FILE FORMAT
-There are two trace file format that you can encounter. The older (v1) format
-is unsupported since version 1.20-rc3 (March 2008). It will still be described
+There are two trace file format that you can encounter. The older (v1) format is
+unsupported since version 1.20\-rc3 (March 2008). It will still be described
 below in case that you get an old trace and want to understand it.
-
-In any case the trace is a simple text file with a single action per line.
-
 .P
+In any case the trace is a simple text file with a single action per line.
+.TP
 .B Trace file format v1
+Each line represents a single I/O action in the following format:
 .RS
-Each line represents a single io action in the following format:
-
+.RS
+.P
 rw, offset, length
-
-where rw=0/1 for read/write, and the offset and length entries being in bytes.
-
-This format is not supported in Fio versions => 1.20-rc3.
-
 .RE
 .P
+where `rw=0/1' for read/write, and the `offset' and `length' entries being in bytes.
+.P
+This format is not supported in fio versions >= 1.20\-rc3.
+.RE
+.TP
 .B Trace file format v2
+The second version of the trace file format was added in fio version 1.17. It
+allows to access more then one file per trace and has a bigger set of possible
+file actions.
 .RS
-The second version of the trace file format was added in Fio version 1.17.
-It allows to access more then one file per trace and has a bigger set of
-possible file actions.
-
+.P
 The first line of the trace file has to be:
-
-\fBfio version 2 iolog\fR
-
+.RS
+.P
+"fio version 2 iolog"
+.RE
+.P
 Following this can be lines in two different formats, which are described below.
+.P
+.B
 The file management format:
-
-\fBfilename action\fR
-
-The filename is given as an absolute path. The action can be one of these:
-
+.RS
+filename action
 .P
-.PD 0
+The `filename' is given as an absolute path. The `action' can be one of these:
 .RS
 .TP
 .B add
-Add the given filename to the trace
+Add the given `filename' to the trace.
 .TP
 .B open
-Open the file with the given filename. The filename has to have been previously
-added with the \fBadd\fR action.
+Open the file with the given `filename'. The `filename' has to have
+been added with the \fBadd\fR action before.
 .TP
 .B close
-Close the file with the given filename. The file must have previously been
-opened.
+Close the file with the given `filename'. The file has to have been
+\fBopen\fRed before.
+.RE
 .RE
-.PD
 .P
-
-The file io action format:
-
-\fBfilename action offset length\fR
-
-The filename is given as an absolute path, and has to have been added and opened
-before it can be used with this format. The offset and length are given in
-bytes. The action can be one of these:
-
+.B
+The file I/O action format:
+.RS
+filename action offset length
 .P
-.PD 0
+The `filename' is given as an absolute path, and has to have been \fBadd\fRed and
+\fBopen\fRed before it can be used with this format. The `offset' and `length' are
+given in bytes. The `action' can be one of these:
 .RS
 .TP
 .B wait
-Wait for 'offset' microseconds. Everything below 100 is discarded.  The time is
-relative to the previous wait statement.
+Wait for `offset' microseconds. Everything below 100 is discarded.
+The time is relative to the previous `wait' statement.
 .TP
 .B read
-Read \fBlength\fR bytes beginning from \fBoffset\fR
+Read `length' bytes beginning from `offset'.
 .TP
 .B write
-Write \fBlength\fR bytes beginning from \fBoffset\fR
+Write `length' bytes beginning from `offset'.
 .TP
 .B sync
-fsync() the file
+\fBfsync\fR\|(2) the file.
 .TP
 .B datasync
-fdatasync() the file
+\fBfdatasync\fR\|(2) the file.
 .TP
 .B trim
-trim the given file from the given \fBoffset\fR for \fBlength\fR bytes
+Trim the given file from the given `offset' for `length' bytes.
+.RE
 .RE
-.PD
-.P
-
 .SH CPU IDLENESS PROFILING
-In some cases, we want to understand CPU overhead in a test. For example,
-we test patches for the specific goodness of whether they reduce CPU usage.
-fio implements a balloon approach to create a thread per CPU that runs at
-idle priority, meaning that it only runs when nobody else needs the cpu.
-By measuring the amount of work completed by the thread, idleness of each
-CPU can be derived accordingly.
-
-An unit work is defined as touching a full page of unsigned characters. Mean
-and standard deviation of time to complete an unit work is reported in "unit
-work" section. Options can be chosen to report detailed percpu idleness or
-overall system idleness by aggregating percpu stats.
-
+In some cases, we want to understand CPU overhead in a test. For example, we
+test patches for the specific goodness of whether they reduce CPU usage.
+Fio implements a balloon approach to create a thread per CPU that runs at idle
+priority, meaning that it only runs when nobody else needs the cpu.
+By measuring the amount of work completed by the thread, idleness of each CPU
+can be derived accordingly.
+.P
+An unit work is defined as touching a full page of unsigned characters. Mean and
+standard deviation of time to complete an unit work is reported in "unit work"
+section. Options can be chosen to report detailed percpu idleness or overall
+system idleness by aggregating percpu stats.
 .SH VERIFICATION AND TRIGGERS
-Fio is usually run in one of two ways, when data verification is done. The
-first is a normal write job of some sort with verify enabled. When the
-write phase has completed, fio switches to reads and verifies everything
-it wrote. The second model is running just the write phase, and then later
-on running the same job (but with reads instead of writes) to repeat the
-same IO patterns and verify the contents. Both of these methods depend
-on the write phase being completed, as fio otherwise has no idea how much
-data was written.
-
-With verification triggers, fio supports dumping the current write state
-to local files. Then a subsequent read verify workload can load this state
-and know exactly where to stop. This is useful for testing cases where
-power is cut to a server in a managed fashion, for instance.
-
+Fio is usually run in one of two ways, when data verification is done. The first
+is a normal write job of some sort with verify enabled. When the write phase has
+completed, fio switches to reads and verifies everything it wrote. The second
+model is running just the write phase, and then later on running the same job
+(but with reads instead of writes) to repeat the same I/O patterns and verify
+the contents. Both of these methods depend on the write phase being completed,
+as fio otherwise has no idea how much data was written.
+.P
+With verification triggers, fio supports dumping the current write state to
+local files. Then a subsequent read verify workload can load this state and know
+exactly where to stop. This is useful for testing cases where power is cut to a
+server in a managed fashion, for instance.
+.P
 A verification trigger consists of two things:
-
 .RS
-Storing the write state of each job
-.LP
-Executing a trigger command
+.P
+1) Storing the write state of each job.
+.P
+2) Executing a trigger command.
 .RE
-
-The write state is relatively small, on the order of hundreds of bytes
-to single kilobytes. It contains information on the number of completions
-done, the last X completions, etc.
-
-A trigger is invoked either through creation (\fBtouch\fR) of a specified
-file in the system, or through a timeout setting. If fio is run with
-\fB\-\-trigger\-file=/tmp/trigger-file\fR, then it will continually check for
-the existence of /tmp/trigger-file. When it sees this file, it will
-fire off the trigger (thus saving state, and executing the trigger
+.P
+The write state is relatively small, on the order of hundreds of bytes to single
+kilobytes. It contains information on the number of completions done, the last X
+completions, etc.
+.P
+A trigger is invoked either through creation ('touch') of a specified file in
+the system, or through a timeout setting. If fio is run with
+`\-\-trigger\-file=/tmp/trigger\-file', then it will continually
+check for the existence of `/tmp/trigger\-file'. When it sees this file, it
+will fire off the trigger (thus saving state, and executing the trigger
 command).
-
-For client/server runs, there's both a local and remote trigger. If
-fio is running as a server backend, it will send the job states back
-to the client for safe storage, then execute the remote trigger, if
-specified. If a local trigger is specified, the server will still send
-back the write state, but the client will then execute the trigger.
-
+.P
+For client/server runs, there's both a local and remote trigger. If fio is
+running as a server backend, it will send the job states back to the client for
+safe storage, then execute the remote trigger, if specified. If a local trigger
+is specified, the server will still send back the write state, but the client
+will then execute the trigger.
 .RE
 .P
 .B Verification trigger example
 .RS
-
-Lets say we want to run a powercut test on the remote machine 'server'.
-Our write workload is in write-test.fio. We want to cut power to 'server'
-at some point during the run, and we'll run this test from the safety
-or our local machine, 'localbox'. On the server, we'll start the fio
-backend normally:
-
-server# \fBfio \-\-server\fR
-
+Let's say we want to run a powercut test on the remote Linux machine 'server'.
+Our write workload is in `write\-test.fio'. We want to cut power to 'server' at
+some point during the run, and we'll run this test from the safety or our local
+machine, 'localbox'. On the server, we'll start the fio backend normally:
+.RS
+.P
+server# fio \-\-server
+.RE
+.P
 and on the client, we'll fire off the workload:
-
-localbox$ \fBfio \-\-client=server \-\-trigger\-file=/tmp/my\-trigger \-\-trigger-remote="bash \-c "echo b > /proc/sysrq-triger""\fR
-
-We set \fB/tmp/my-trigger\fR as the trigger file, and we tell fio to execute
-
-\fBecho b > /proc/sysrq-trigger\fR
-
-on the server once it has received the trigger and sent us the write
-state. This will work, but it's not \fIreally\fR cutting power to the server,
-it's merely abruptly rebooting it. If we have a remote way of cutting
-power to the server through IPMI or similar, we could do that through
-a local trigger command instead. Lets assume we have a script that does
-IPMI reboot of a given hostname, ipmi-reboot. On localbox, we could
-then have run fio with a local trigger instead:
-
-localbox$ \fBfio \-\-client=server \-\-trigger\-file=/tmp/my\-trigger \-\-trigger="ipmi-reboot server"\fR
-
-For this case, fio would wait for the server to send us the write state,
-then execute 'ipmi-reboot server' when that happened.
-
+.RS
+.P
+localbox$ fio \-\-client=server \-\-trigger\-file=/tmp/my\-trigger \-\-trigger\-remote="bash \-c "echo b > /proc/sysrq\-triger""
+.RE
+.P
+We set `/tmp/my\-trigger' as the trigger file, and we tell fio to execute:
+.RS
+.P
+echo b > /proc/sysrq\-trigger
+.RE
+.P
+on the server once it has received the trigger and sent us the write state. This
+will work, but it's not really cutting power to the server, it's merely
+abruptly rebooting it. If we have a remote way of cutting power to the server
+through IPMI or similar, we could do that through a local trigger command
+instead. Let's assume we have a script that does IPMI reboot of a given hostname,
+ipmi\-reboot. On localbox, we could then have run fio with a local trigger
+instead:
+.RS
+.P
+localbox$ fio \-\-client=server \-\-trigger\-file=/tmp/my\-trigger \-\-trigger="ipmi\-reboot server"
+.RE
+.P
+For this case, fio would wait for the server to send us the write state, then
+execute `ipmi\-reboot server' when that happened.
 .RE
 .P
 .B Loading verify state
 .RS
-To load store write state, read verification job file must contain
-the verify_state_load option. If that is set, fio will load the previously
+To load stored write state, a read verification job file must contain the
+\fBverify_state_load\fR option. If that is set, fio will load the previously
 stored state. For a local fio run this is done by loading the files directly,
-and on a client/server run, the server backend will ask the client to send
-the files over and load them from there.
-
+and on a client/server run, the server backend will ask the client to send the
+files over and load them from there.
 .RE
-
 .SH LOG FILE FORMATS
-
 Fio supports a variety of log file formats, for logging latencies, bandwidth,
 and IOPS. The logs share a common format, which looks like this:
-
-.B time (msec), value, data direction, offset
-
-Time for the log entry is always in milliseconds. The value logged depends
-on the type of log, it will be one of the following:
-
+.RS
 .P
-.PD 0
+time (msec), value, data direction, block size (bytes), offset (bytes)
+.RE
+.P
+`Time' for the log entry is always in milliseconds. The `value' logged depends
+on the type of log, it will be one of the following:
+.RS
 .TP
 .B Latency log
-Value is in latency in usecs
+Value is latency in nsecs
 .TP
 .B Bandwidth log
-Value is in KB/sec
+Value is in KiB/sec
 .TP
 .B IOPS log
-Value is in IOPS
-.PD
-.P
-
-Data direction is one of the following:
-
+Value is IOPS
+.RE
 .P
-.PD 0
+`Data direction' is one of the following:
+.RS
 .TP
 .B 0
-IO is a READ
+I/O is a READ
 .TP
 .B 1
-IO is a WRITE
+I/O is a WRITE
 .TP
 .B 2
-IO is a TRIM
-.PD
-.P
-
-The \fIoffset\fR is the offset, in bytes, from the start of the file, for that
-particular IO. The logging of the offset can be toggled with \fBlog_offset\fR.
-
-If windowed logging is enabled though \fBlog_avg_msec\fR, then fio doesn't log
-individual IOs. Instead of logs the average values over the specified
-period of time. Since \fIdata direction\fR and \fIoffset\fR are per-IO values,
-they aren't applicable if windowed logging is enabled. If windowed logging
-is enabled and \fBlog_max_value\fR is set, then fio logs maximum values in
-that window instead of averages.
-
+I/O is a TRIM
 .RE
-
+.P
+The entry's `block size' is always in bytes. The `offset' is the offset, in bytes,
+from the start of the file, for that particular I/O. The logging of the offset can be
+toggled with \fBlog_offset\fR.
+.P
+Fio defaults to logging every individual I/O. When IOPS are logged for individual
+I/Os the `value' entry will always be 1. If windowed logging is enabled through
+\fBlog_avg_msec\fR, fio logs the average values over the specified period of time.
+If windowed logging is enabled and \fBlog_max_value\fR is set, then fio logs
+maximum values in that window instead of averages. Since `data direction', `block size'
+and `offset' are per\-I/O values, if windowed logging is enabled they
+aren't applicable and will be 0.
 .SH CLIENT / SERVER
-Normally you would run fio as a stand-alone application on the machine
-where the IO workload should be generated. However, it is also possible to
-run the frontend and backend of fio separately. This makes it possible to
-have a fio server running on the machine(s) where the IO workload should
-be running, while controlling it from another machine.
-
-To start the server, you would do:
-
-\fBfio \-\-server=args\fR
-
-on that machine, where args defines what fio listens to. The arguments
-are of the form 'type:hostname or IP:port'. 'type' is either 'ip' (or ip4)
-for TCP/IP v4, 'ip6' for TCP/IP v6, or 'sock' for a local unix domain
-socket. 'hostname' is either a hostname or IP address, and 'port' is the port to
-listen to (only valid for TCP/IP, not a local socket). Some examples:
-
+Normally fio is invoked as a stand\-alone application on the machine where the
+I/O workload should be generated. However, the backend and frontend of fio can
+be run separately i.e., the fio server can generate an I/O workload on the "Device
+Under Test" while being controlled by a client on another machine.
+.P
+Start the server on the machine which has access to the storage DUT:
+.RS
+.P
+$ fio \-\-server=args
+.RE
+.P
+where `args' defines what fio listens to. The arguments are of the form
+`type,hostname' or `IP,port'. `type' is either `ip' (or ip4) for TCP/IP
+v4, `ip6' for TCP/IP v6, or `sock' for a local unix domain socket.
+`hostname' is either a hostname or IP address, and `port' is the port to listen
+to (only valid for TCP/IP, not a local socket). Some examples:
+.RS
+.TP
 1) \fBfio \-\-server\fR
-
-   Start a fio server, listening on all interfaces on the default port (8765).
-
+Start a fio server, listening on all interfaces on the default port (8765).
+.TP
 2) \fBfio \-\-server=ip:hostname,4444\fR
-
-   Start a fio server, listening on IP belonging to hostname and on port 4444.
-
+Start a fio server, listening on IP belonging to hostname and on port 4444.
+.TP
 3) \fBfio \-\-server=ip6:::1,4444\fR
-
-   Start a fio server, listening on IPv6 localhost ::1 and on port 4444.
-
+Start a fio server, listening on IPv6 localhost ::1 and on port 4444.
+.TP
 4) \fBfio \-\-server=,4444\fR
-
-   Start a fio server, listening on all interfaces on port 4444.
-
+Start a fio server, listening on all interfaces on port 4444.
+.TP
 5) \fBfio \-\-server=1.2.3.4\fR
-
-   Start a fio server, listening on IP 1.2.3.4 on the default port.
-
+Start a fio server, listening on IP 1.2.3.4 on the default port.
+.TP
 6) \fBfio \-\-server=sock:/tmp/fio.sock\fR
-
-   Start a fio server, listening on the local socket /tmp/fio.sock.
-
-When a server is running, you can connect to it from a client. The client
-is run with:
-
-\fBfio \-\-local-args \-\-client=server \-\-remote-args <job file(s)>\fR
-
-where \-\-local-args are arguments that are local to the client where it is
-running, 'server' is the connect string, and \-\-remote-args and <job file(s)>
-are sent to the server. The 'server' string follows the same format as it
-does on the server side, to allow IP/hostname/socket and port strings.
-You can connect to multiple clients as well, to do that you could run:
-
-\fBfio \-\-client=server2 \-\-client=server2 <job file(s)>\fR
-
-If the job file is located on the fio server, then you can tell the server
-to load a local file as well. This is done by using \-\-remote-config:
-
-\fBfio \-\-client=server \-\-remote-config /path/to/file.fio\fR
-
-Then fio will open this local (to the server) job file instead
-of being passed one from the client.
-
+Start a fio server, listening on the local socket `/tmp/fio.sock'.
+.RE
+.P
+Once a server is running, a "client" can connect to the fio server with:
+.RS
+.P
+$ fio <local\-args> \-\-client=<server> <remote\-args> <job file(s)>
+.RE
+.P
+where `local\-args' are arguments for the client where it is running, `server'
+is the connect string, and `remote\-args' and `job file(s)' are sent to the
+server. The `server' string follows the same format as it does on the server
+side, to allow IP/hostname/socket and port strings.
+.P
+Fio can connect to multiple servers this way:
+.RS
+.P
+$ fio \-\-client=<server1> <job file(s)> \-\-client=<server2> <job file(s)>
+.RE
+.P
+If the job file is located on the fio server, then you can tell the server to
+load a local file as well. This is done by using \fB\-\-remote\-config\fR:
+.RS
+.P
+$ fio \-\-client=server \-\-remote\-config /path/to/file.fio
+.RE
+.P
+Then fio will open this local (to the server) job file instead of being passed
+one from the client.
+.P
 If you have many servers (example: 100 VMs/containers), you can input a pathname
-of a file containing host IPs/names as the parameter value for the \-\-client option.
-For example, here is an example "host.list" file containing 2 hostnames:
-
+of a file containing host IPs/names as the parameter value for the
+\fB\-\-client\fR option. For example, here is an example `host.list'
+file containing 2 hostnames:
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
 host1.your.dns.domain
-.br
+.P
 host2.your.dns.domain
-
+.PD
+.RE
+.P
 The fio command would then be:
-
-\fBfio \-\-client=host.list <job file>\fR
-
-In this mode, you cannot input server-specific parameters or job files, and all
+.RS
+.P
+$ fio \-\-client=host.list <job file(s)>
+.RE
+.P
+In this mode, you cannot input server\-specific parameters or job files \-\- all
 servers receive the same job file.
-
-In order to enable fio \-\-client runs utilizing a shared filesystem from multiple hosts,
-fio \-\-client now prepends the IP address of the server to the filename. For example,
-if fio is using directory /mnt/nfs/fio and is writing filename fileio.tmp,
-with a \-\-client hostfile
-containing two hostnames h1 and h2 with IP addresses 192.168.10.120 and 192.168.10.121, then
-fio will create two files:
-
+.P
+In order to let `fio \-\-client' runs use a shared filesystem from multiple
+hosts, `fio \-\-client' now prepends the IP address of the server to the
+filename. For example, if fio is using the directory `/mnt/nfs/fio' and is
+writing filename `fileio.tmp', with a \fB\-\-client\fR `hostfile'
+containing two hostnames `h1' and `h2' with IP addresses 192.168.10.120 and
+192.168.10.121, then fio will create two files:
+.RS
+.P
+.PD 0
 /mnt/nfs/fio/192.168.10.120.fileio.tmp
-.br
+.P
 /mnt/nfs/fio/192.168.10.121.fileio.tmp
-
+.PD
+.RE
 .SH AUTHORS
-
 .B fio
 was written by Jens Axboe <jens.axboe@oracle.com>,
 now Jens Axboe <axboe@fb.com>.
 .br
 This man page was written by Aaron Carroll <aaronc@cse.unsw.edu.au> based
 on documentation by Jens Axboe.
+.br
+This man page was rewritten by Tomohiro Kusumi <tkusumi@tuxera.com> based
+on documentation by Jens Axboe.
 .SH "REPORTING BUGS"
 Report bugs to the \fBfio\fR mailing list <fio@vger.kernel.org>.
-See \fBREADME\fR.
+.br
+See \fBREPORTING\-BUGS\fR.
+.P
+\fBREPORTING\-BUGS\fR: \fIhttp://git.kernel.dk/cgit/fio/plain/REPORTING\-BUGS\fR
 .SH "SEE ALSO"
 For further documentation see \fBHOWTO\fR and \fBREADME\fR.
 .br
-Sample jobfiles are available in the \fBexamples\fR directory.
+Sample jobfiles are available in the `examples/' directory.
+.br
+These are typically located under `/usr/share/doc/fio'.
+.P
+\fBHOWTO\fR: \fIhttp://git.kernel.dk/cgit/fio/plain/HOWTO\fR
+.br
+\fBREADME\fR: \fIhttp://git.kernel.dk/cgit/fio/plain/README\fR